Uncle Wiggilys Adventures

Uncle Wiggily's Adventures

Howard Roger Garis

Howard Roger Garis

Young Jim Hawkins and his friends set sail for Treasure Island, hoping to find the buried loot of Captain Flint, fiercest of all the pirates. But, unknown to them, the crew of their own ship is made up of Flint\'s former crew, led by the evil one-legged pirate Long John Silver. Once on the island Jim and his friends must find the buried treasure and escape before the pirates capture them. Robert Louis Stevensons timeless tale of greed and gold remains the most exciting adventure story ever written.
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Uncle Wiggilys Travels

Uncle Wiggily's Travels

Howard Roger Garis

Howard Roger Garis

You know when Uncle Wiggily Longears, the old rabbit gentleman, started out to look for his fortune, he had to travel many weary miles, and many adventures happened to him. Some of those adventures I have told you in the book just before this one, and now I am going to tell you about his travels when he hoped to find a lot of money, so he would be rich. One day, as I told you in the last story in the other book, Uncle Wiggily came to a farm, and there he had quite an adventure with a little boy. And this little boy had on red trousers, because, I guess, his blue ones were in the washtub. Anyhow, he and the rabbit gentleman became good friends. And now I am going to tell you what happened when Uncle Wiggily met the red squirrel. --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition. --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.
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Uncle Wiggily and Old Mother Hubbard

Uncle Wiggily and Old Mother Hubbard

Howard Roger Garis

Howard Roger Garis

UNCLE WIGGILY AND THE THIRD KITTEN Uncle Wiggily Longears, the nice old gentleman rabbit, came walking slowly up the front path that led to his hollow-stump bungalow. He was limping a little on his red, white and blue striped barber-pole rheumatism crutch that Nurse Jane Fuzzy Wuzzy, the muskrat lady housekeeper, had gnawed for him out of a corn-stalk. “Well, I’m glad to be home again,” said the rabbit uncle, sitting down on the front porch to rest a minute. And just then the door in the hollow stump opened, and Nurse Jane, looking out, said: “Oh, here he is now, Mrs. Purr.” With that a cat lady came to the door and she said: “Oh, Uncle Wiggily! I thought you never would come back. Did you find her?” “Find who?” asked the rabbit gentleman. “I was not looking for any one. I have just been down to Lincoln Park to see some squirrels who live in a hollow tree. They are second cousins to Johnnie and Billie Bushytail, the squirrels who live in our woods. I had a nice visit with them.” “Then you didn’t find Wuzzo, my third little lost kitten, did you?” asked Mrs. Purr, the cat mother. “What! Is Wuzzo still lost?” asked the bunny uncle, in great surprise. “I thought she had come home.” “No, she hasn’t,” said Mrs. Purr. “You know you found my other kittens, Fuzzo and Muzzo, for me, but Wuzzo, the third little kitten, is still lost. She has been away all night, and I came over here the first thing this morning to see if you would not kindly go look for her. But you had already left and I have been waiting here ever since for you to come back.” “Yes, I stayed longer with the park squirrels than I meant to,” said Uncle Wiggily. “But now I am back I will start off and try to find Wuzzo. It’s too bad your three little kittens ran away.” They had, you know, as I told you in the two stories before this one. The three little kittens ate cherry pie with their new mittens on. And they soiled their mittens. Then they were so afraid their mother, Mrs. Purr, would scold them that they all ran away. But Mrs. Purr was a kind cat, and would not have scolded at all. And when she found her little kittens were gone she asked Uncle Wiggily to find them. “And you did find the first two, Fuzzo and Muzzo,” said the cat lady. “So I am sure you can find the third one, Wuzzo.” “I hope I can,” Uncle Wiggily said. “I remember now I started off to find her, but my rheumatism hurt me so I had to come back to my bungalow. Then I forgot all about Wuzzo. But I’m all right now, and I’ll start off.” So away over the fields and through the woods went Uncle Wiggily, looking for the third little lost kitten. When he had found the two others he had helped them wash the pie-juice off their mittens, so they were nice and clean. And then the kittens were not afraid to go home. Uncle Wiggily looked all over for the third little kitten, under bushes, up in trees (for cats climb trees, you know), and even behind big rocks Uncle Wiggily looked....
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The Curlytops on Star Island; Or, Camping out with Grandpa

The Curlytops on Star Island; Or, Camping out with Grandpa

Howard Roger Garis

Howard Roger Garis

Unlike some other reproductions of classic texts (1) We have not used OCR(Optical Character Recognition), as this leads to bad quality books with introduced typos. (2) In books where there are images such as portraits, maps, sketches etc We have endeavoured to keep the quality of these images, so they represent accurately the original artefact. Although occasionally there may be certain imperfections with these old texts, we feel they deserve to be made available for future generations to enjoy.
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Uncle Wiggily in the Woods

Uncle Wiggily in the Woods

Howard Roger Garis

Howard Roger Garis

STORY I UNCLE WIGGILY AND THE WILLOW TREE "Well, it\'s all settled!" exclaimed Uncle Wiggily Longears, the rabbit gentleman, one day, as he hopped up the steps of his hollow stump bungalow where Nurse Jane Fuzzy Wuzzy, his muskrat lady housekeeper, was fanning herself with a cabbage leaf tied to her tail. "It\'s all settled." "What is?" asked Miss Fuzzy Wuzzy. "You don\'t mean to tell me anything has happened to you?" and she looked quite anxious. "No, I\'m all right," laughed Uncle Wiggily, "and I hope you are the same. What I meant was that it\'s all settled where we are going to spend our vacation this Summer." "Oh, tell me where!" exclaimed the muskrat lady clapping her paws, anxious like. "In a hollow stump bungalow, just like this, but in the woods instead of in the country," answered Uncle Wiggily. "Oh, that will be fine!" cried Miss Fuzzy Wuzzy. "I love the woods. When are we to go?" "Very soon now," answered the bunny gentleman uncle. "You may begin to pack up as quickly as you please." And Nurse Jane and Uncle Wiggily moved to the woods very next day and his adventures began. I guess most of you know about the rabbit gentleman and his muskrat lady housekeeper who nursed him when he was ill with the rheumatism. Uncle Wiggily had lots and lots of adventures, about which I have told you in the books before this one. He had traveled about seeking his fortune, he had even gone sailing in his airship, and once he met Mother Goose and all her friends from Old King Cole down to Little Jack Horner. Uncle Wiggily had many friends among the animal boys and girls. There was Sammie and Susie Littletail, the rabbits, who have a book all to themselves; just as have Jackie and Peetie Bow Wow, the puppy dog boys, and Jollie and Jillie Longtail, the mice children. "And I s\'pose we\'ll meet all your friends in the woods, won\'t we, Uncle Wiggily?" asked Nurse Jane, as they moved from the old hollow stump bungalow to the new one. "Oh, yes, I s\'pose so, of course," he laughed in answer, as he pulled his tall silk hat more tightly down on his head, fastened on his glasses and took his red, white and blue striped barber pole rheumatism crutch that Nurse Jane had gnawed for him out of a cornstalk. So, once upon a time, not very many years ago, as all good stories should begin, Uncle Wiggily and Nurse Jane found themselves in the woods. It was lovely among the trees, and as soon as the rabbit gentleman had helped Miss Fuzzy Wuzzy put the hollow stump bungalow to rights he started out for a walk. "I want to see what sort of adventures I shall have in the woods," said Mr. Longears as he hopped along. Now in these woods lived, among many other creatures good and bad, two skillery-scalery alligators who were not exactly friends of the bunny uncle. But don\'t let that worry you, for though the alligators, and other unpleasant animals, may, once in a while, make trouble for Uncle Wiggily, I\'ll never really let them hurt him. I\'ll fix that part all right! So, one day, the skillery-scalery alligator with the humps on his tail, and his brother, another skillery-scalery chap, whose tail was double jointed, were taking a walk through the woods together just as Uncle Wiggily was doing....
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Uncle Wiggily in Wonderland

Uncle Wiggily in Wonderland

Howard Roger Garis

Howard Roger Garis

Once upon a time, after Uncle Wiggily Longears, the nice bunny rabbit gentleman, had some funny adventures with Baby Bunty, and when he found that his rheumatism did not hurt him so much as he hopped on his red, white and blue striped barber pole crutch, the bunny uncle wished he might have some strange and wonderful adventures.
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The Curlytops at Sunset Beach; Or, What Was Found in the Sand

The Curlytops at Sunset Beach; Or, What Was Found in the Sand

Howard Roger Garis

Howard Roger Garis

This scarce antiquarian book is a facsimile reprint of the original. Due to its age, it may contain imperfections such as marks, notations, marginalia and flawed pages. Because we believe this work is culturally important, we have made it available as part of our commitment for protecting, preserving, and promoting the world\'s literature in affordable, high quality, modern editions that are true to the original work. --This text refers to the Paperback edition. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.
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Daddy Takes Us to the Garden

Daddy Takes Us to the Garden

Howard Roger Garis

Howard Roger Garis

Daddy Takes Us to the Garden - The Daddy Series for Little Folks is presented here in a high quality paperback edition. This popular classic work by Howard Roger Garis is in the English language, and may not include graphics or images from the original edition. If you enjoy the works of Howard Roger Garis then we highly recommend this publication for your book collection.
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Mostly Mary

Mostly Mary

Howard Roger Garis

Howard Roger Garis

"Dickie-Bird, have you seen our Goldilocks?" asked a deep voice at the door of the playroom. "Here I am, Father!" and a dear little girl, half hidden by the window curtains, dropped the doll which she had been hugging and ran into Mr. Selwyn\'s arms. "I\'m so glad you are here! Everything has been so—so different this morning. Liza came, instead of Aunt Mandy, to call me and help me to dress and then she told me to wait here for you, and——and——"
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Daddy Takes Us Skating

Daddy Takes Us Skating

Howard Roger Garis

Howard Roger Garis

Daddy Takes Us Skating is presented here in a high quality paperback edition. This popular classic work by Howard Roger Garis is in the English language, and may not include graphics or images from the original edition. If you enjoy the works of Howard Roger Garis then we highly recommend this publication for your book collection. --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition. --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.
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Dick Hamiltons Football Team; Or, A Young Millionaire On The Gridiron

Dick Hamilton's Football Team; Or, A Young Millionaire On The Gridiron

Howard Roger Garis

Howard Roger Garis

This scarce antiquarian book is a facsimile reprint of the original. Due to its age, it may contain imperfections such as marks, notations, marginalia and flawed pages. Because we believe this work is culturally important, we have made it available as part of our commitment for protecting, preserving, and promoting the world\'s literature in affordable, high quality, modern editions that are true to the original work. --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition. --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.
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The White Crystals: Being an Account of the Adventures of Two Boys

The White Crystals: Being an Account of the Adventures of Two Boys

Howard Roger Garis

Howard Roger Garis

Dr. Glasby looked over the rims of his spectacles at the boy before him. Then he glanced at Mr. Anderson, cleared his throat with a loud "ahem" that made Roger start, and said, very ponderously: "Um!" "Well?" asked Mr. Anderson, a little anxious tone coming into his voice, "what\'s the verdict, doctor?" "Um!" said the physician again. "Nothing very serious, Mr. Anderson. Roger, here, is a little run down, that\'s all. He\'s been studying too hard, his eyes are a trifle weak, muscles flabby, and his blood hasn\'t enough of the good red stuff in it. In short, he must live out of doors for a year or so, and then I\'ll guarantee he will come back with red cheeks and a pair of arms that will make you proud of him. Eh, Roger?" and Dr. Glasby pinched the rather small and soft biceps of the boy, smiling the while, good naturedly. --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition. --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.
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