The Man Who Was Thursday: A Nightmare

The Man Who Was Thursday: A Nightmare

G. K. Chesterton

Fiction / Crime / Religion

The Man Who Was Thursday: A Nightmare is sometimes referred to as a metaphysical thriller. In Edwardian era London, Gabriel Syme is recruited at Scotland Yard to a secret anti-anarchist police corps. Lucian Gregory, an anarchistic poet, lives in the suburb of Saffron Park. Syme meets him at a party and they debate the meaning of poetry. Gregory argues that revolt is the basis of poetry. Syme demurs, insisting the essence of poetry is not revolution but law.
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The Napoleon of Notting Hill

The Napoleon of Notting Hill

G. K. Chesterton

Fiction / Crime / Religion

How is this book unique? Font adjustments & biography included Unabridged (100% Original content) Illustrated About The Napoleon Of Notting Hill by G. K. Chesterton The Napoleon of Notting Hill is a novel written by G. K. Chesterton in 1904, set in a nearly unchanged London in 1984. Although the novel is set in the future, it is, in effect, set in an alternative reality of Chesterton's own period, with no advances in technology or changes in the class system or attitudes. It postulates an impersonal government, not described in any detail, but apparently content to operate through a figurehead king, randomly chosen.
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The Trees of Pride

The Trees of Pride

G. K. Chesterton

Fiction / Crime / Religion

"We wish you\'d get rid of what you\'ve got here, sir," he observed, digging doggedly. "Nothing\'ll grow right with them here." "Shrubs " said the Squire, laughing. "You don\'t call the peacock trees shrubs, do you? Fine tall trees -- you ought to be proud of them." "Ill weeds grow apace," observed the gardener. "Weeds can grow as houses when somebody plants them." Then he added: "Him that sowed tares in the Bible, Squire." "Oh, blast your --" began the Squire, and then replaced the more apt and alliterative word "Bible" by the general word "superstition."
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The Man Who Knew Too Much

The Man Who Knew Too Much

G. K. Chesterton

Fiction / Crime / Religion

The Man Who Knew Too Much is a book of detective stories by English writer G. K. Chesterton, published in 1922 by Cassell and Company in the United Kingdom, and Harper Brothers in the United States. The book contains eight connected short stories about "The Man Who Knew Too Much", and additional unconnected stories featuring separate heroes/detectives. The United States edition contained one of these additional stories: "The Trees of Pride", while the United Kingdom edition contained "Trees of Pride" and three more, shorter stories: "The Garden of Smoke", "The Five of Swords" and "The Tower of Treason". Horne Fisher, "The Man Who Knew Too Much", is the main protagonist of the first eight stories. In the final story, "The Vengeance of the Statue", Fisher notes: "The Prime Minister is my father\'s friend. The Foreign Minister married my sister. The Chancellor of the Exchequer is my first cousin." Because of these intimate relationships with the leading political figures in the land, Fisher knows too much about the private politics behind the public politics of the day. This knowledge is a burden to him in the eight stories, because he is able to uncover the injustices and corruptions of the murders in each story, but in most cases the real killer gets away with the killing because to bring him openly to justice would create a greater chaos: starting a war, reinciting Irish rebellions or removing public faith in the government.
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Manalive

Manalive

G. K. Chesterton

Fiction / Crime / Religion

A masterpiece in two parts, G.K. Chesterton\'s Manalive is a commentary on the "Holy Fool" trope that shows up in many classic texts such as Don Quixote. The book follows the fun loving Innocent Smith who, after bringing joy to a boarding house, is charged with a series of crimes including attempted murder. The second half covers the trial which, through many twists and turns, brings out a stunning conclusion that touches upon many larger ideas. At the center of the novel is the idea of human life, and what makes everyday living worthwhile.
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The Ball and the Cross

The Ball and the Cross

G. K. Chesterton

Fiction / Crime / Religion

Like much of G. K. Chesterton\'s fiction, The Ball and the Cross is both witty and profound, cloaking serious religious and philosophical inquiry in sparkling humor and whimsy. Serialized in the British publication The Commonwealth in 1905-06, Chesterton\'s second novel first appeared in book form in America in 1909, delighting and challenging readers with its heady mixture of fantasy, farce, and theology.The plot of The Ball and the Cross chronicles a hot dispute between two Scotsmen, one a devout but naive Roman Catholic, the other a zealous but naive atheist. Their fanatically held opinions—leading to a duel that is proposed but never fought—inspire a host of comic adventures whose allegorical levels vigorously explore the debate between theism and atheism.Martin Gardner\'s superb introduction to The Ball and the Cross reveals the real-life debate between Chesterton and a famous atheist that provided inspiration for the story, and it explores some of the novel\'s possible allegorical meanings. Appraising the book\'s many intriguing philosophical qualities, Mr. Gardner alerts readers as well to the pleasures of its "colorful style . . . amusing puns and clever paradoxes . . . and the humor and melodrama of its crazy plot."
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The Man Who Was Thursday (Penguin ed)

The Man Who Was Thursday (Penguin ed)

G. K. Chesterton

Fiction / Crime / Religion

Can you trust yourself when you don't know who you are? In a park in London, secret policeman Gabriel Syme strikes up a conversation with an anarchist. Sworn to do his duty, Syme uses his new acquaintance to go undercover in Europe's Central Anarchist Council and infiltrate their deadly mission, even managing to have himself voted to the position of 'Thursday'. When Syme discovers another undercover policeman on the Council, however, he starts to question his role in their operations. And as a desperate chase across Europe begins, his confusion grows, as well as his confidence in his ability to outwit his enemies. But he has still to face the greatest terror that the Council has: a man named Sunday, whose true nature is worse than Syme could ever have imagined ...
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The Victorian Age in Literature

The Victorian Age in Literature

G. K. Chesterton

Fiction / Crime / Religion

A fascinating survey of Victorian literature from one of England’s greatest minds Dishing out his signature brand of harsh wit, G. K. Chesterton casts a critical eye on the poets and novelists that defined the Victorian age in English literature. “Her imagination was sometimes superhuman—always inhuman,” he writes of Emily Brontë. “Wuthering Heights might have been written by an eagle.” Ranging from sharp denunciation to genuine admiration, Chesterton critiques the works of Tennyson, Ruskin, Eliot, Byron, and Shelley, among many others. He explores the influence of religion on the world of art and expounds upon the gridlock he believes to be permeating England in the early twentieth century. Conversational in style but exacting in its commentary, The Victorian Age in Literature is an indispensable account of this influential era in literary history. This ebook has been professionally proofread to ensure accuracy and readability on all devices. **About the Author G. K. Chesterton (1874–1936) was a prolific English journalist and author best known for his mystery series featuring the priest-detective Father Brown and for the metaphysical thriller The Man Who Was Thursday. Baptized into the Church of England, Chesterton underwent a crisis of faith as a young man and became fascinated with the occult. He eventually converted to Roman Catholicism and published some of Christianity’s most influential apologetics, including Heretics and Orthodoxy.
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Murder On Christmas Eve

Murder On Christmas Eve

G. K. Chesterton

Fiction / Crime / Religion

Christmas Eve. While the world sleeps, snow falls gently from the sky, presents await under the tree ... and murder is afoot. In this collection of ten classic murder mysteries from the best crime writers in history, death and mayhem take many festive forms, from the inventive to the unexpected.From a Santa Claus with a grudge to a cat who knows who killed its owner on Christmas Eve, these are stories to enjoy - and be mystified by - in front of a roaring fire, mince pie to hand.
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