The Boys of Bellwood School; Or, Frank Jordan's Triumph

      Frank V. Webster

The Boys of Bellwood School; Or, Frank Jordans Triumph

Unlike some other reproductions of classic texts (1) We have not used OCR(Optical Character Recognition), as this leads to bad quality books with introduced typos. (2) In books where there are images such as portraits, maps, sketches etc We have endeavoured to keep the quality of these images, so they represent accurately the original artefact. Although occasionally there may be certain imperfections with these old texts, we feel they deserve to be made available for future generations to enjoy. --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition. --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.
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    Two Boy Gold Miners; Or, Lost in the Mountains

      Frank V. Webster

Two Boy Gold Miners; Or, Lost in the Mountains

Frank V. Webster was one of the early 20th century's most prolific authors of kids adventure books and Westerns, but that was due in large part to the fact that Frank V. Webster was actually many authors. Using Webster's name as a pseudonym, the Stratemeyer Syndicate published a number of books tailor made for boys, and they are still popular today.
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    Book of Cheerful Cats and Other Animated Animals

      Frank V. Webster

Book of Cheerful Cats and Other Animated Animals

This is a collection of cartoons and a long nursery rhyme for children. The cartoons involve mainly cats and other animals but the nursery rhyme is mainly about three little kittens. Cheerful illustrated cartoons about cats and other animals comprise the major part of this book. This is followed by "Three Little Kittens" which is an English language nursery rhyme. The rhyme can be seen as a cautionary tale involving the relationship between parents and children. The book includes about 60 illustrations. It is a pleasure to publish this new, high quality, and affordable edition.
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    Ralph of the Roundhouse; Or, Bound to Become a Railroad Man

      Frank V. Webster

Ralph of the Roundhouse; Or, Bound to Become a Railroad Man

The Daylight Express rolled up to the depot at Stanley Junction, on time, circling past the repair shops, freight yard and roundhouse, a thing of life and beauty. Stanley Junction had become a wide-awake town of some importance since the shops had been moved there, and when a second line took it in as a passing point, the old inhabitants pronounced the future of the Junction fully determined. Engine No. 6, with its headlight shining like a piece of pure crystal, its metal trimmings furbished up bright and natty-looking, seemed to understand that it was the model of the road, and sailed majestically to a repose that had something of dignity and grandeur to it.
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    The Young Firemen of Lakeville; Or, Herbert Dare's Pluck

      Frank V. Webster

The Young Firemen of Lakeville; Or, Herbert Dares Pluck

Frank V. Webster was one of the early 20th century's most prolific authors of kids adventure books and Westerns, but that was due in large part to the fact that Frank V. Webster was actually many authors. Using Webster's name as a pseudonym, the Stratemeyer Syndicate published a number of books tailor made for boys, and they are still popular today.
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    Boy Knight

      Frank V. Webster

Boy Knight

Reverend Martin Jerome Scott, S.J., Litt. D. (1865-1954) was an American priest of the Society of Jesus of the Roman Catholic Church and author of a number of books, pamphlets, and articles.
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    Book of One Syllable

      Frank V. Webster

Book of One Syllable

THE WRECK OF A FEAST. What a sad sight it is to see a young child who does not know how to keep a check on the wish that tempts him to do wrong. The first rule that they who love a child should teach him, is the rule of self. It is the want of this self-rule that is the cause of so much that is bad in the world. It is this that makes girls and boys think more of what they want to do, than of what they ought to do; and each time they give way to it, they find it more hard not to yield the next time; and thus they go on till they are grown-up folks. They who would not like to grow up in this bad way must take great care while they are young not to think so much of self. The sense of taste is the sense that a child likes best to use. It would be strange to see a child who did not like cake, or tart, or fruit, or most sweet things. But a child should know when it is right to eat, and when it is right not to eat: he should know that he ought not to touch nice things that are not meant for him. The tale we have to tell is of a young girl who had not this sense of right so strong as it ought to have been. She knew what it was right to do, and she knew what it was wrong to do, but yet the sense of right was not at all times quite strong. The name of this girl was Ruth Grey. RUTH GREY.Page 4. Now there was a room in Mr. Grey's house known by the name of the green-house room, and here were put a few choice plants that could not bear the cold air. In this room too there was a large stand, on which were set out all the sweet things when Mrs. Grey had friends to dine or take tea with her. Here they were all put, to be brought out at the right time. The door of this room was kept shut, and made fast with a lock and key. Ruth had seen some of these nice things put on the stand, but she had not seen all, and she had a great wish to see them. She thought, if the door should not be shut, she would just peep in. She went twice to the door, but she found it fast. When she went a third time she found the key left in, and as she thought she could turn the key, she did, and went in. Now it was wrong in Ruth to want to go near this room, as she knew quite well that Mrs. Grey did not wish her to go in. Once when she was near the door she thought she heard some one, and then she ran off as fast as she could. This she would not have done if she had not felt sure it was wrong to go in that room. But now she was in! and what did she see there? Why, she saw the stand quite full of all sorts of nice sweet things. There were sponge cakes, and plum cakes, and queen cakes; there were two turn-outs, and whips and creams of all sorts; and there was a cake hid in red jam, with small thin white things put all up and down it, which stuck out. What could this be? She was sure it was jam, and yet she was sure jam was too soft to stand up in that way: she would just touch it. She did touch it, and she felt there was some hard thing in it: that could not be jam! It was strange! She would just like to know what it was: she must taste a small bit of the top—that could not spoil it, and she did so much want to know....
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    Boy Pilot of the Lakes; Or, Nat Morton's Perils

      Frank V. Webster

Boy Pilot of the Lakes; Or, Nat Mortons Perils

Frank V. Webster was one of the early 20th century's most prolific authors of kids adventure books and Westerns, but that was due in large part to the fact that Frank V. Webster was actually many authors. Using Webster's name as a pseudonym, the Stratemeyer Syndicate published a number of books tailor made for boys, and they are still popular today.
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    Ralph in the Switch Tower; Or, Clearing the Track

      Frank V. Webster

Ralph in the Switch Tower; Or, Clearing the Track

Ralph Fairbanks was bound to become a railroad man, as his father had been before him. Step by step he worked his way upward, serving first in the Roundhouse, cleaning locomotives; then in the Switch Tower, clearing the tracks; then on the Engine, as a fireman; then as engineer of the Overland Express; and finally as Train Dispatcher. In this line of books there is revealed the whole workings of a great American railroad system. There are adventures in abundance - railroad wrecks, dashes through forest fires, the pursuit of a "wildcat" locomotive, the disappearance of a pay car with a large sum of money on board - but there is much more than this - the intense rivalry among railroads and railroad men, the working out of running schedules, the getting through "on time" in spite of all obstacles, and the manipulation of railroad securities by evil men who wish to rule or ruin. These are books that every American boy ought to own. CONTENTS CHAPTER I--DOWN AND OUT CHAPTER II--UP THE LADDER CHAPTER III--A CLOSE GRAZE CHAPTER IV--A MYSTERY CHAPTER V--THE STOWAWAY CHAPTER VI--MRS. FAIRBANKS' VISITOR CHAPTER VII--"YOUNG SLAVIN" CHAPTER VIII--A BAD LOT CHAPTER IX--CALCUTTA TOM CHAPTER X--A MILE A MINUTE CHAPTER XI--SPOILING FOR A FIGHT CHAPTER XII--THE SUPERINTENDENT'S OPINION CHAPTER XIII--SQUARING THINGS CHAPTER XIV--A BUSY EVENING CHAPTER XV--A HERO DESPITE HIMSELF CHAPTER XVI--KIDNAPPED CHAPTER XVII--A MIDNIGHT VISITOR CHAPTER XVIII--A DESPERATE CHANCE CHAPTER XIX--THE DOUBLE WRECK CHAPTER XX--THE CRAZY ORDERS CHAPTER XXI--IKE SLUMPS "NUTCRACKER" CHAPTER XXII--A HEADSTRONG FRIEND CHAPTER XXIII--IKE SLUMP & CO. CHAPTER XXIV--FIRE! CHAPTER XXV--THE LITTLE TIN BOX CHAPTER XXVI--A CLEW! CHAPTER XXVII--SLAVIN GETS A JOB CHAPTER XXVIII--WHAT THE "EXTRA" TOLD CHAPTER XXIX--GUESSING CHAPTER XXX--PRECIOUS FREIGHT CHAPTER XXXI--HALF A MILLION DOLLARS CHAPTER XXXII--CONCLUSION
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    Airship Andy; Or, The Luck of a Brave Boy

      Frank V. Webster

Airship Andy; Or, The Luck of a Brave Boy

Frank V. Webster was one of the early 20th century's most prolific authors of kids adventure books and Westerns, but that was due in large part to the fact that Frank V. Webster was actually many authors. Using Webster's name as a pseudonym, the Stratemeyer Syndicate published a number of books tailor made for boys, and they are still popular today.
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