Lateshows

      Frank Moorhouse

Lateshows

THE CLUBI also thought I moved with what was called the Fast Crowd but I have begun to face up to the slowing of the Fast Crowd. My friends now not only move with a more leisurely pace, I observe, but with an undignified lack of urgency, are slower to rise from their chairs, and also, I have noticed, they have begun to procreate.The Late Family had arrived in my life. For some of my friends the Late Family had replaced the Late Show.THE MOVIEThis is a story about how the flow of life is made into stories, how stories become films, how the making of stories and films itself becomes stories, and how stories become the flow of life.THE CABARET VOLTAIREIt occurs to me that the telephone answering machine is something of a wall, albeit a friendly wall. Robert Frost's neighbour says that good fences make good neighbours. Good greetings on a telephone answering machine make good telephone neighbours. But as Frost says, 'Something there is that doesn't love a wall, That wants...

Read online
  • 67

    Tales of Mystery and Romance

      Frank Moorhouse

Tales of Mystery and Romance

Travel, sex, death and love - a most surprising collection of stories.'I love airports. I love the opera of airports . . . Families with high-gloss airport emotion, a linkage of smiles, tears and touching. A moratorium on malice, air-conditioned goodwill. When the airport sanctuary is left, the automatic doors open into the sweaty heat and blown litter, and they also re-open the wounds of the family and the dust blows into the lacerations.' In an odyssey which moves across a world stage, Tales of Mystery and Romance touches high comedy and low farce - the non-event of the Jack Kerouac Wake, the dispute over the exact form of secular penetration achieved by Milton, an argument with an ex-wife over 'motel sex' - and much tender and perceptive observation. You will come away from this book at least knowing something about belly dancers, the intricacies of homosexual sex, and even life after death.

Read online
  • 56

    Loose Living

      Frank Moorhouse

Loose Living

A book of comic writing that incisively dissects our contemporary new sensitivities.How our Hero came to be a cultural ambassador in France fell into strange company; how he encountered the Duc and his entourage; how Europe responded to his Australian ways; how refinement eluded him; how the queen of commas almost brought him down by tugging his rope; how he became an honoured member of the Montaigne Clinic for civilised disorders; and how he began to discover the good life and how to get it when disaster struck. As Australia turns to Asia, Moorhouse's hero is permitted one last look at Europe. Loose Living is his dispatches home, detailing his arrival in the wondrously civilised world of France; his glittering life at the chateau with the Duc; his fall into disgrace at the Ecole des Beaux Arts Perdus; and his appointment as Gregarious Fellow at the Montaigne Clinic for Civilised disorders, deep in the Pyrenees. Incorporating Cuisine Cruelle compiled by Chef Bilson and...

Read online
  • 52

    Forty-Seventeen

      Frank Moorhouse

Forty-Seventeen

He is a failed writer turned diplomat, an anarchist learning the value of discipline. He moves in a world which takes him from the Australian wilderness to the conference rooms of Vienna and Geneva; from the whore-house to warzone he feels the pull of the genetic spiral of his ancestry. At the sharp axis of his mid-life he scans the memorabilia of his feelings in the hope of giving answers.. In his first full-length novel Moorhouse presents a roving, dissatisfied man entering middle age in a house-of-mirrors portrait: fragmentary and multifaceted. Sean, a hard-drinking, hard-living Australian, has just turned 40; the other half of the title refers to a precocious schoolgirl who is one of his many liaisons. The most important of the other women who drift into and out of his life include his ex-wife Robyn, now unflinching in the face of cancer; Belle, Sean's fellow sexual adventurer; and Edith Campbell Berry, an aging iconoclast whom Sean encounters in Vienna and Israel.FORTY...

Read online
  • 38

    The Everlasting Secret Family

      Frank Moorhouse

The Everlasting Secret Family

'Sometimes the way they misunderstood each other was more interesting than what they'd meant to say.''Sometimes they completed each other's sentences or said the second sentence of the other's conversation. Sometimes Backhouse completed Irving's sentences in a much better way, although sometimes along altogether different lines of meaning. But he usually let it go and went with the new meaning contributed by Backhouse, wherever it went. Sometimes the way they misunderstood each other was more interesting than what they'd meant to say.' Within Frank Moorhouse's four stories in The Everlasting Secret Family, each complete in itself but together creating a reverberating atmosphere and the suggestion of unrevealed connections, there are all manner of intriguing secrets. The stories abound with secret brotherhood, with foreigners defying all attempts at assimilation, with strangers whose only real identification marks are the secrets they carry. And they're still as shocking and thought-provoking today as they were when they were first published nearly thirty years ago.

Read online
  • 36

    Grand Days

      Frank Moorhouse

Grand Days

Meet Edith Campbell Berry, the woman all Australian women would like to be.On a train from Paris to Geneva, Edith Campbell Berry meets Major Ambrose Westwood in the dining car, makes his acquaintance over a lunch of six courses, and allows him to kiss her passionately.Their early intimacy binds them together once they reach Geneva and their posts at the newly created League of Nations. There, a heady idealism prevails over Edith and her young colleagues, and nothing seems beyond their grasp, certainly not world peace. The exuberance of the times carries over into Geneva nights: Edith is drawn into a dark and glamorous underworld where, coaxed by Ambrose, she becomes more and more sexually adventurous. Reading Grand Days is a rare experience: it is vivid and wise, full of shocks of recognition and revelation. The final effect of the book is intoxicating and unplaceably original.

Read online
  • 28

    The Electrical Experience

      Frank Moorhouse

The Electrical Experience

T. George McDowell believes in getting the job done.'I do not care for words in top hats. I believe in shirt-sleeve words. I believe in getting the job done. We're like that on the coast.' T. George McDowell, a manufacturer of soft drinks on the south coast of New South Wales, prides himself on extolling the virtues of progress. He is a Rotarian and exponent of wireless, refrigeration and electricity. He is a Realist and a Rationalist - a 'fair man but hard as nails' according to his staff - but trouble in the shape of his youngest daughter, Terri, tests his values and beliefs, and he finds that his own sexual longings begin to intrude in his dreams. First published in 1974, The Electrical Experience is an at times humorous examination of the Australian soul, and won the National Book Council Award for Fiction.

Read online
  • 23

    The Americans, Baby

      Frank Moorhouse

The Americans, Baby

A timeless collection of stories exploring physical and psychological boundaries, some tentatively and others with vigour.In The Americans, Baby the milieu is a Sydney under-40 population who, hoping that being earnest or outrageous will make them feel real, are left saturated with anxiety instead. An inherent resistance to American cultural intrusions and the risks that those from a great powerful land such as the US take when they meddle in another culture (they can be snared, seduced, destroyed) are explored with traditional Moorhouse flair and wit. These stories are timeless in their concerns, and explore ideology, idealism, conflict, relationships and sex.

Read online
  • 21

    The Drover's Wife

      Frank Moorhouse

The Drover's Wife

Since Henry Lawson wrote his story 'The Drover's Wife' in 1892, Australian writers, painters, performers and photographers have created a wonderful tradition of drover's wife works, stories and images.
The Russell Drysdale painting from 1945 extended the mythology and it, too, has become an Australian icon.
Other versions of the Lawson story have been written by Murray Bail, Barbara Jefferis, Mandy Sayer, David Ireland, Madeleine Watts and others, up to the present, including Leah Purcell's play and Ryan O'Neill's graphic novel.
In essays and commentary, Frank Moorhouse examines our ongoing fascination with this story and has collected some of the best pieces of writing on the subject. This remarkable, gorgeous book is, he writes, 'a monument to the drovers' wives'.
Read online
  • 19

    Dark Palace

      Frank Moorhouse

Dark Palace

Five years have passed since Edith Campbell Berry's triumphant arrival at the League of Nations in Geneva, determined to right the wrongs of the world. The idealism of those early grand days has been eroded by a sense foreboding as the world moves ever closer to another war. Edith's life too, has changed: her marriage and her work are no longer the anchors in her life -- she is restless, unsure, feeling the weight of history upon her and her world.As her certainties crumble, Edith is once again joined by Ambrose Westwood, her old friend and lover. Their reunion is joyful, and her old anxiety about their unconventional relationship is replaced by a feeling that all things are possible -- at least in her private life. But World War II advances inexorably, and Edith, Ambrose and their fellow officers must come to terms with the knowledge that their best efforts -- and those of the well-meaning world -- are simply useless against the forces of the time. Moving, wise and utterly...

Read online
  • 19

    The Inspector-General of Misconception

      Frank Moorhouse

The Inspector-General of Misconception

'Australia's funniest writer' Clive JamesFrom eating oysters to the lost art of speech-making, Frank Moorhouse as The Inspector General applies his fastidious eye to the habits and ways of our society. Described by Clive James as Australia's Funniest Author, Frank Moorhouse brings satire, irreverence and mischievous wit to this ultimate compendium to sorting things out.

Read online
  • 16

    Cold Light

      Frank Moorhouse

Cold Light

Shortlisted for the Barbara Jefferiss Prize and longlisted for the Miles Franklin AwardIt is 1950, the League of Nations has collapsed and the newly formed United Nations has rejected all those who worked and fought for the League. Edith Campbell Berry, who joined the League in Geneva before the war, is out of a job, her vision shattered. With her sexually unconventional husband, Ambrose, she comes back to Australia to live in Canberra. Edith now has ambitions to become Australia's first female ambassador, but while she waits for a Call from On High, she finds herself caught up in the planning of the national capital and the dream that it should be 'a city like no other'. When her communist brother, Frederick, turns up out of the blue after many years of absence, she becomes concerned that he may jeopardise her chances of becoming a diplomat. It is not a safe time to be a communist in Australia or to be related to one, but she refuses to be cowed by the anti-communist...

Read online
  • 15

    Days of Wine and Rage

      Frank Moorhouse

Days of Wine and Rage

This was social history - entertaining, fascinating and informing - in the making.Days of Wine and Rage explores the tempo and shifts in mores and style of a dynamic decade - the 70s - in Australia's cultural development. Deftly interweaving literature and documentary history, Frank Moorhouse traces, from their avant-garde origins, significant threads in Australia's social fabric - the sub-cultural movements towards sexual liberation, cultural identity and a new creative and intellectual confidence. The multi-faceted examination evokes a lively impression of the ambience in which these social changes were generated and of the characters who got them going. Frank Moorhouse was hailed as 'the widest-read chronicler of the new intelligentsia and their uncertainties'. Nowhere are his skills in literary and editorial craftsmanship and his acuity as observer of social nuance more evident than in this book.

Read online
  • 8