Tarzan of the Apes

Tarzan of the Apes

Edgar Rice Burroughs

Science Fiction & Fantasy / Literature & Fiction

Edgar Rice Burroughs (September 1, 1875 – March 19, 1950) has obtained lasting fame for his works about the jungle hero Tarzan, and also for the heroic Mars adventurer John Carter, but he was a voluminous writer who also wrote in many other genres as well. Burroughs famously got started out of disdain for others’ writings, noting that "if people were paid for writing rot such as I read in some of those magazines, that I could write stories just as rotten. As a matter of fact, although I had never written a story, I knew absolutely that I could write stories just as entertaining and probably a whole lot more so than any I chanced to read in those magazines."
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The Return of Tarzan

The Return of Tarzan

Edgar Rice Burroughs

Science Fiction & Fantasy / Literature & Fiction

"Magnifique!" ejaculated the Countess de Coude, beneath her breath. "Eh?" questioned the count, turning toward his young wife. "What is it that is magnificent?" and the count bent his eyes in various directions in quest of the object of her admiration. "Oh, nothing at all, my dear," replied the countess, a slight flush momentarily coloring her already pink cheek. "I was but recalling with admiration those stupendous skyscrapers, as they call them, of New York," and the fair countess settled herself more comfortably in her steamer chair, and resumed the magazine which "nothing at all" had caused her to let fall upon her lap.
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Jungle Tales of Tarzan

Jungle Tales of Tarzan

Edgar Rice Burroughs

Science Fiction & Fantasy / Literature & Fiction

Excerpt from Jungle Tales of TarzanEeka, stretched at luxurious ease in the shade Of the tropical forest, presented, un quationably, a most alluring picture of young, feminine loveliness. Or at least so thought Tarzan of the Apes, who squatted upon a low-swinging branch in a near-by tree and looked down upon her. Just to have seen him there, lolling upon the swaying bough of the jungle-forest giant, his brown skin mottled by the brilliant equatorial sunlight which percolated through the leafy canopy of green above him, his clean-limbed body relaxed in graceful case, his shapely head partly turned in contempla tive absorption and his intelligent, gray eyes dream ily devouring the Obj ect of their devotion, you would have thought him the reincarnation of some dernigod Of old.About the PublisherForgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.comThis book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.
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The Son of Tarzan

The Son of Tarzan

Edgar Rice Burroughs

Science Fiction & Fantasy / Literature & Fiction

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it.This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work.Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. To ensure a quality reading experience, this work has been proofread and republished using a format that seamlessly blends the original graphical elements with text in an easy-to-read typeface.We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.
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Tarzan and the Jewels of Opar

Tarzan and the Jewels of Opar

Edgar Rice Burroughs

Science Fiction & Fantasy / Literature & Fiction

Tarzan And The Jewels Of Opar #5 In the previous novel Tarzan and Jane's son, Jack Clayton, a.k.a. Korak, had come into his own. In this novel Tarzan returns to Opar, the source of the gold where a lost colony of fabled Atlantis is located, in order to make good on some financial reverses he has recently suffered. While Atlantis itself sank beneath the waves thousands of years ago, the workers of Opar continued to mine all of the gold, which means there is a rather huge stockpile but which is now lost to the memory of the Oparians and only Tarzan knows its secret location.
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The Lost Continent

The Lost Continent

Edgar Rice Burroughs

Science Fiction & Fantasy / Literature & Fiction

The Lost Continent is one of the least-known of Burroughs' thrilling science-fiction tales. In the year 2137, civilization has been in decline for nearly two centuries, and war-torn Europe is but a distant memory to the inhabitants of the isolated United States. But an American adventurer rediscovers the Old World, which has become a strange and savage land.
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Tarzan the Terrible

Tarzan the Terrible

Edgar Rice Burroughs

Science Fiction & Fantasy / Literature & Fiction

In the previous volume, the Lord of the Jungle discovered the burnt corpse of his wife, Jane, after a visit to his African home by German soldiers. (One suspects that Burroughs never did like Jane; this sort of thing happened to her a lot.) In this volume, Tarzan learns that Jane was not murdered by the Germans but kidnaped -- and sets off in pursuit. As the novel begins, Tarzan has spent two months tracking his mate to Pal-ul-don (-Land of Men-), a hidden valley in Zaire, where he finds a land dinosaurs and men even stranger -- humanoids with tails. Ta-den is a hairless, white-skinned, Ho-don warrior; O-mat is a hairy, black skinned, Waz-don, chief of the tribe of Kor-ul-ja. In this new world Tarzan becomes a captive -- but he impresses his captors so well that they name him Tarzan-Jad-Guru (-Tarzan the Terrible-). Meanwhile, a second visitor has come to Pal-ul-don -- wearing only a loin cloth and carrying an Enfield rifle along and a long knife. Pal-ul-don is where Jane is being held captive, of course. . . .
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The Monster Me

The Monster Men

Edgar Rice Burroughs

Science Fiction & Fantasy / Literature & Fiction

As Number Thirteen, the last and best of Professor Maxon's attempts to create human life, roams the jungles of an island off the coast of Borneo, only Maxon's daughter, Virginia, knows of the creature's kind heart. Reprint.The Monster Men is a 1913 science fiction novel written by American author Edgar Rice Burroughs under the working title "Number Thirteen". It first appeared in print under the title of "A Man Without a Soul" in the November, 1913 issue of All-Story Magazine.
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Tarzan the Untamed

Tarzan the Untamed

Edgar Rice Burroughs

Science Fiction & Fantasy / Literature & Fiction

Tarzan the Untamed is a book by American writer Edgar Rice Burroughs, the seventh in his series of books about the title character Tarzan. It was originally published as two separate stories serialized in different pulp magazines; "Tarzan the Untamed" (also known as "Tarzan and the Huns") in Redbook from March to August, 1919, and "Tarzan and the Valley of Luna" in All-Story Weekly from March to April 1920. The two stories were combined under the title of the first in the first book edition, published in 1920 by A. C. McClurg. In order of writing, the book follows Jungle Tales of Tarzan, a collection of short stories about the ape-man's youth.
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The Mad King

The Mad King

Edgar Rice Burroughs

Science Fiction & Fantasy / Literature & Fiction

All Lustadt was in an uproar. The mad king had escaped. Little knots of excited men stood upon the street corners listening to each latest rumor concerning this most absorbing occurrence. Before the palace a great crowd surged to and fro, awaiting they knew not what. For ten years no man of them had set eyes upon the face of the boy-king who had been hastened to the grim castle of Blentz upon the death of the old king, his father. There had been murmurings then when the lad's uncle, Peter of Blentz, had announced to the people of Lutha the sudden mental affliction which had fallen upon his nephew, and more murmurings for a time after the announcement that Peter of Blentz had been appointed Regent during the lifetime of the young King Leopold, "or until God, in His infinite mercy, shall see fit to restore to us in full mental vigor our beloved monarch." But ten years is a long time. The boy-king had become but a vague memory to the subjects who could recall him at all. There were many, of course, in the capital city, Lustadt, who still retained a mental picture of the handsome boy who had ridden out nearly every morning from the palace gates beside the tall, martial figure of the old king, his father, for a canter across the broad plain which lies at the foot of the mountain town of Lustadt; but even these had long since given up hope that their young king would ever ascend his throne, or even that they should see him alive again. Peter of Blentz had not proved a good or kind ruler. Taxes had doubled during his regency. Executives and judiciary, following the example of their chief, had become tyrannical and corrupt. For ten years there had been small joy in Lutha.
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The Rider

The Rider

Edgar Rice Burroughs

Science Fiction & Fantasy / Literature & Fiction

Karlova and Margoth had been enemies for centuries--and now they were about to join in peaceful alliance through the marriage of Princess Mary and Prince Boris. But the Rider, the most successful highwayman ever to plague the two countries, secretly became part of the royal wedding plans. From the non, nothing went according to schedule. Who was this mysterious brigand? What could he gain by sabotaging the two nations' only chance for peace?
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Tarzan of the Apes Edgar Rice Burroughs

Tarzan of the Apes Edgar Rice Burroughs

Edgar Rice Burroughs

Science Fiction & Fantasy / Literature & Fiction

Tarzan of the Apes is a novel written by Edgar Rice Burroughs, the first in a series of books about the title character Tarzan. It was first published in the pulp magazine All-Story Magazine in October 1912. So popular was the character that Burroughs continued the series into the 1940s with two dozen sequels. For the novel's centennial anniversary, Library of America published a hardcover edition based on the original book in April 2012 with an introduction by Thomas Mallon
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