Great Porter Square: A Mystery. v. 1

Great Porter Square: A Mystery. v. 1

B. L. Farjeon

B. L. Farjeon

CHAPTER I.INTRODUCES MRS. JAMES PREEDY; HINTS AT THE TROUBLE INTO WHICH SHE HAS FALLEN; AND GIVES AN INSIGHT INTO HER SOCIAL POSITION.Mrs. James Preedy, lodging-house keeper, bred and born in the vocation, and consequently familiar with all the moves of that extensive class of persons in London that has no regular home, and has to be cooked for, washed for, and generally done for, sat in the kitchen of her house, No. 118, Great Porter Square. This apartment was situated in the basement, and here Mrs. Preedy received her friends and “did” for her lodgers, in so far as the cooking for them can be said to be included in that portentous and significant term. The floor of the kitchen was oil-clothed, with, in distinguished places, strips of carpet of various patterns and colours, to give it an air. Over the mantelpiece was a square looking-glass in a mahogany frame, ranged on each side of which were faded photographs of men, women, and children, and of one gentleman in particular pretending to smoke a long pipe. This individual, whose face was square, whose aspect was frowning, and whose shirt sleeves were tucked up in an exceedingly free and easy fashion, was the pictorial embodiment of Mrs. Preedy’s deceased husband. While he lived he was “a worryer, my dear,” to quote Mrs. Preedy—and to do the lady justice, he looked it; but being gone to that bourne from which no lodging-house keeper ever returns, he immediately took his place in the affections of his widow as “the dear departed” and a “blessed angel.” Thus do we often find tender appreciation budding into flower even at the moment the undertaker nails the lid upon the coffin, and Mr. Preedy, when the breath was out of his body, might (spiritually) have consoled himself with the reflection that he was not the only person from whose grave hitherto unknown or unrecognised virtues ascend. The weapons of the dead warrior, two long and two short pipes, were ranged crosswise on the wall with mathematical tenderness. When her day’s work was over, and Mrs. Preedy, a lonely widow, sat by herself in the kitchen, she was wont to look regretfully at those pipes, wishing that he who had smoked them were alive to puff again as of yore; forgetting, in the charity of her heart, the crosses and vexations of her married life, and how often she had called her “blessed angel” a something I decline to mention for defiling the kitchen with his filthy smoke.CONTENTS1. Introduces Mrs. James Preedy; hints at the trouble into which she has fallen; and gives an insight into her social position2. What was printed on the quarto bill: a proclamation by her Majesty’s Government3. Extracted from the “Evening Moon”4. The examination of Mrs. Preedy, continued from the “Evening Moon”5. Contains further extracts from the “Evening Moon” relating to the Great Porter Square mystery6. The “Evening Moon” speaks its mind7. In which the “Evening Moon” continues to speak its mind8. The “Evening Moon” postpones its statement respecting Antony Cowlrick9. In which the “Evening Moon” relates the adventures of its Special Correspondent10. The Special Reporter of the “Evening Moon” makes the acquaintance of a little match girl11. The “Evening Moon” for a time takes leave of the case of Antony Cowlrick12. Mrs. Preedy has dreadful dreams13. Mrs. Preedy’s young man lodger14. In which Becky commences a letter to a friend in the country15. In which Becky continues her letter, and relates how she obtained the situation at No. 11816. In which Becky writes a second letter to her friend in the country, and gives a woman’s reason for not liking Richard Manx17. In which Becky, continuing her letter, relates her impressions of Mrs. Preedy’s young man lodger18. The “Evening Moon” reopens the subject of the Great Porter Square murder, and relates a romantic story concerning the murdered man and his widow19. The “Evening Moon” continues its account of the tragedy, and describes the shameful part enacted by Mr. F
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Great Porter Square: A Mystery. v. 2

Great Porter Square: A Mystery. v. 2

B. L. Farjeon

B. L. Farjeon

CHAPTER I.INTRODUCES MRS. JAMES PREEDY; HINTS AT THE TROUBLE INTO WHICH SHE HAS FALLEN; AND GIVES AN INSIGHT INTO HER SOCIAL POSITION.Mrs. James Preedy, lodging-house keeper, bred and born in the vocation, and consequently familiar with all the moves of that extensive class of persons in London that has no regular home, and has to be cooked for, washed for, and generally done for, sat in the kitchen of her house, No. 118, Great Porter Square. This apartment was situated in the basement, and here Mrs. Preedy received her friends and “did” for her lodgers, in so far as the cooking for them can be said to be included in that portentous and significant term. The floor of the kitchen was oil-clothed, with, in distinguished places, strips of carpet of various patterns and colours, to give it an air. Over the mantelpiece was a square looking-glass in a mahogany frame, ranged on each side of which were faded photographs of men, women, and children, and of one gentleman in particular pretending to smoke a long pipe. This individual, whose face was square, whose aspect was frowning, and whose shirt sleeves were tucked up in an exceedingly free and easy fashion, was the pictorial embodiment of Mrs. Preedy’s deceased husband. While he lived he was “a worryer, my dear,” to quote Mrs. Preedy—and to do the lady justice, he looked it; but being gone to that bourne from which no lodging-house keeper ever returns, he immediately took his place in the affections of his widow as “the dear departed” and a “blessed angel.” Thus do we often find tender appreciation budding into flower even at the moment the undertaker nails the lid upon the coffin, and Mr. Preedy, when the breath was out of his body, might (spiritually) have consoled himself with the reflection that he was not the only person from whose grave hitherto unknown or unrecognised virtues ascend. The weapons of the dead warrior, two long and two short pipes, were ranged crosswise on the wall with mathematical tenderness. When her day’s work was over, and Mrs. Preedy, a lonely widow, sat by herself in the kitchen, she was wont to look regretfully at those pipes, wishing that he who had smoked them were alive to puff again as of yore; forgetting, in the charity of her heart, the crosses and vexations of her married life, and how often she had called her “blessed angel” a something I decline to mention for defiling the kitchen with his filthy smoke.CONTENTS1. Introduces Mrs. James Preedy; hints at the trouble into which she has fallen; and gives an insight into her social position2. What was printed on the quarto bill: a proclamation by her Majesty’s Government3. Extracted from the “Evening Moon”4. The examination of Mrs. Preedy, continued from the “Evening Moon”5. Contains further extracts from the “Evening Moon” relating to the Great Porter Square mystery6. The “Evening Moon” speaks its mind7. In which the “Evening Moon” continues to speak its mind8. The “Evening Moon” postpones its statement respecting Antony Cowlrick9. In which the “Evening Moon” relates the adventures of its Special Correspondent10. The Special Reporter of the “Evening Moon” makes the acquaintance of a little match girl11. The “Evening Moon” for a time takes leave of the case of Antony Cowlrick12. Mrs. Preedy has dreadful dreams13. Mrs. Preedy’s young man lodger14. In which Becky commences a letter to a friend in the country15. In which Becky continues her letter, and relates how she obtained the situation at No. 11816. In which Becky writes a second letter to her friend in the country, and gives a woman’s reason for not liking Richard Manx17. In which Becky, continuing her letter, relates her impressions of Mrs. Preedy’s young man lodger18. The “Evening Moon” reopens the subject of the Great Porter Square murder, and relates a romantic story concerning the murdered man and his widow19. The “Evening Moon” continues its account of the tragedy, and describes the shameful part enacted by Mr. F
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Great Porter Square: A Mystery. v. 3

Great Porter Square: A Mystery. v. 3

B. L. Farjeon

B. L. Farjeon

CHAPTER I.INTRODUCES MRS. JAMES PREEDY; HINTS AT THE TROUBLE INTO WHICH SHE HAS FALLEN; AND GIVES AN INSIGHT INTO HER SOCIAL POSITION.Mrs. James Preedy, lodging-house keeper, bred and born in the vocation, and consequently familiar with all the moves of that extensive class of persons in London that has no regular home, and has to be cooked for, washed for, and generally done for, sat in the kitchen of her house, No. 118, Great Porter Square. This apartment was situated in the basement, and here Mrs. Preedy received her friends and “did” for her lodgers, in so far as the cooking for them can be said to be included in that portentous and significant term. The floor of the kitchen was oil-clothed, with, in distinguished places, strips of carpet of various patterns and colours, to give it an air. Over the mantelpiece was a square looking-glass in a mahogany frame, ranged on each side of which were faded photographs of men, women, and children, and of one gentleman in particular pretending to smoke a long pipe. This individual, whose face was square, whose aspect was frowning, and whose shirt sleeves were tucked up in an exceedingly free and easy fashion, was the pictorial embodiment of Mrs. Preedy’s deceased husband. While he lived he was “a worryer, my dear,” to quote Mrs. Preedy—and to do the lady justice, he looked it; but being gone to that bourne from which no lodging-house keeper ever returns, he immediately took his place in the affections of his widow as “the dear departed” and a “blessed angel.” Thus do we often find tender appreciation budding into flower even at the moment the undertaker nails the lid upon the coffin, and Mr. Preedy, when the breath was out of his body, might (spiritually) have consoled himself with the reflection that he was not the only person from whose grave hitherto unknown or unrecognised virtues ascend. The weapons of the dead warrior, two long and two short pipes, were ranged crosswise on the wall with mathematical tenderness. When her day’s work was over, and Mrs. Preedy, a lonely widow, sat by herself in the kitchen, she was wont to look regretfully at those pipes, wishing that he who had smoked them were alive to puff again as of yore; forgetting, in the charity of her heart, the crosses and vexations of her married life, and how often she had called her “blessed angel” a something I decline to mention for defiling the kitchen with his filthy smoke.CONTENTS1. Introduces Mrs. James Preedy; hints at the trouble into which she has fallen; and gives an insight into her social position2. What was printed on the quarto bill: a proclamation by her Majesty’s Government3. Extracted from the “Evening Moon”4. The examination of Mrs. Preedy, continued from the “Evening Moon”5. Contains further extracts from the “Evening Moon” relating to the Great Porter Square mystery6. The “Evening Moon” speaks its mind7. In which the “Evening Moon” continues to speak its mind8. The “Evening Moon” postpones its statement respecting Antony Cowlrick9. In which the “Evening Moon” relates the adventures of its Special Correspondent10. The Special Reporter of the “Evening Moon” makes the acquaintance of a little match girl11. The “Evening Moon” for a time takes leave of the case of Antony Cowlrick12. Mrs. Preedy has dreadful dreams13. Mrs. Preedy’s young man lodger14. In which Becky commences a letter to a friend in the country15. In which Becky continues her letter, and relates how she obtained the situation at No. 11816. In which Becky writes a second letter to her friend in the country, and gives a woman’s reason for not liking Richard Manx17. In which Becky, continuing her letter, relates her impressions of Mrs. Preedy’s young man lodger18. The “Evening Moon” reopens the subject of the Great Porter Square murder, and relates a romantic story concerning the murdered man and his widow19. The “Evening Moon” continues its account of the tragedy, and describes the shameful part enacted by Mr. F
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A Secret Inheritance (Volume 3 of 3)

A Secret Inheritance (Volume 3 of 3)

B. L. Farjeon

B. L. Farjeon

This is an EXACT reproduction of a book published before 1923. This IS NOT an OCR\'d book with strange characters, introduced typographical errors, and jumbled words. This book may have occasional imperfections such as missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. that were either part of the original artifact, or were introduced by the scanning process. We believe this work is culturally important, and despite the imperfections, have elected to bring it back into print as part of our continuing commitment to the preservation of printed works worldwide. We appreciate your understanding of the imperfections in the preservation process, and hope you enjoy this valuable book.
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A Secret Inheritance  (Volume 2 of 3)

A Secret Inheritance (Volume 2 of 3)

B. L. Farjeon

B. L. Farjeon

Excerpt from A Secret Inheritance, Vol. 2 of 3 Family circumstances rendered me more than ever my own master; I was free to go whithersoever my inclination led me, and certainly my inclination pointed clearly to that part of the World where I should be most likely to find my dear friend. But I had no clue to guide me to turn east, west, north, or south, in search of him would have been a hap-hazard proceeding, and to hope for success in so unintelligent a search would have been the hope of a madman. My anxiety with respect to the fate of Silvain and Kristel never deserted me, but it was many years before I was enabled to take up the links in the chain. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.
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A Secret Inheritance  (Volume 1 of 3)

A Secret Inheritance (Volume 1 of 3)

B. L. Farjeon

B. L. Farjeon

Leopold Classic Library is delighted to publish this classic book as part of our extensive collection. As part of our on-going commitment to delivering value to the reader, we have also provided you with a link to a website, where you may download a digital version of this work for free. Many of the books in our collection have been out of print for decades, and therefore have not been accessible to the general public. Whilst the books in this collection have not been hand curated, an aim of our publishing program is to facilitate rapid access to this vast reservoir of literature. As a result of this book being first published many decades ago, it may have occasional imperfections. These imperfections may include poor picture quality, blurred or missing text. While some of these imperfections may have appeared in the original work, others may have resulted from the scanning process that has been applied. However, our view is that this is a significant literary work, which deserves to be brought back into print after many decades. While some publishers have applied optical character recognition (OCR), this approach has its own drawbacks, which include formatting errors, misspelt words, or the presence of inappropriate characters. Our philosophy has been guided by a desire to provide the reader with an experience that is as close as possible to ownership of the original work. We hope that you will enjoy this wonderful classic book, and that the occasional imperfection that it might contain will not detract from the experience.
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Samuel Boyd of Catchpole Square: A Mystery

Samuel Boyd of Catchpole Square: A Mystery

B. L. Farjeon

B. L. Farjeon

At six o\'clock in the evening of the first day of March, in the year of Grace, 1898, Abel Death, a man of middle age, with a face appropriate to his name--which should never be given to any living human being--was sitting at his desk, employed in the task of writing the last of a number of letters, in accordance with the instructions of his employer, Mr. Samuel Boyd, of No. 6, Catchpole Square, in the North district of London. The letters all referred to Money: to Money due for principal and interest, and to warnings and threats of what would be done in case prompt payment was not made at such and such an hour on such and such a day. Uncompromising and relentless to the point of cruelty, debtors were told in plain terms that ruin was their portion if Mr. Boyd\'s demands were not complied with.
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