AIKEN, JOAN SERIES:

(1/3) Go Saddle the Sea

(1/3) Go Saddle the Sea

Aiken, Joan

Aiken, Joan

Felix Brooke, the orphaned son of an English soldier and an aristocratic Spanish mother, has been raised in the strict, loveless household of his grandfather in Villaverde, Spain. When Felix gains possession of a letter that contains a clue to the whereabouts of his father's family, he gladly runs away form home to pursue the trail. His journey from Spain to far-off England begins the adventure of a lifetime.
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(2/3) The Teeth of the Gale

(2/3) The Teeth of the Gale

Aiken, Joan

Aiken, Joan

From Publishers WeeklyIn this suspenseful sequel to Go Saddle the Sea and Bridle the Wind , both set in early 19th century Spain, a mature Felix returns, prepared for adventure. Three children have been kidnapped by their father, an escaped political prisoner who is hiding in the mountains. Will Felix be able to free them? Even knowing these are "wild and heartless times" because of King Ferdinand's terrible reign, he agrees to try. The trip will give him a chance to see his love, Juana. From the start, it seems that the little party is being followed. The horses are poisoned, and there are further ominous signs of a plot. Whom can they trust? Have they been sent into a trap? Intrigue is Aiken's stock-in-trade, and there is plenty to be found in this novel. While readers may sense a lack of underlying theme and wish for a greater development of Felix's affection for Juana, they could hardly ask for a more diverting, action-filled plot. As usual, Aiken writes with endless inventiveness and ease. Ages 12-up. Copyright 1988 Reed Business Information, Inc. From School Library JournalGrade 7 Up A stirring continuation of the adventures of the resourceful orphaned heir who, at 12, ran away from his Spanish grandfather's estate to seek his English father's people in Go Saddle the Sea (Doubleday, 1977; o.p.); and a year later made a shipwrecked return, in Bridle the Wind (Delacorte, 1983). It is a more mature Felix, now 18, who develops an understanding of his responsibilities as he meets physical dangers and political intrigues when his studies are interrupted and his help asked in regaining custody of children kidnapped by their mad fatheran escaped political prisoner. His elderly aunts fear that it is all a political trap to confiscate the estates, as grandfather is a known liberal, whose friends and views are out of favor with the restored monarch turned reactionary. But one member of the rescue party is Juana, the Basque girl whom Felix lovesrespectfully, since she has entered a conventand hopefully, since she has not taken final vows. Full of action, interesting characters, and made-real places, this forms a well-meshed conclusion to earlier episodes and an intriguing glimpse into Spain in the 1820s. (Author's historic notes and reading list are appended.) These books get better with each reading; share them with the adults. Ruth M. McConnell, San Antonio Public LibraryCopyright 1988 Reed Business Information, Inc.
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(3/3) Bridle the Wind

(3/3) Bridle the Wind

Aiken, Joan

Aiken, Joan

After visiting his family in England, Felix is on his way back to Spain when he's shipwrecked off the coast of France. He is taken in by monks to recover from his ordeal--but it soon becomes clear to him that he is actually being held prisoner. Felix encounters an injured boy, Juan, on the grounds of the monastery and saves him from death. The two boys escape and continue on to Spain together--but a gang is pursuing Juan, and the journey is more dangerous than they imagined.
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