Discipline

Discipline

W.E. Larson

Fantasy / Science Fiction / Children's

There's no joy in coming of age for Lexi. As a illegitimate third-born daughter, she knew the day only held exile from her clan-hold. Outside the walls of her home, there is only the unforgiving desert under the stationary sun of her world. Exile is a thin euphemism for death.Lady Arachne spins lies as beautifully as she weaves tapestries, but it’s her conceit that may be downfall. Challenged by the goddess Athena with a test of their skills, Arachne may have finally met their match. If she doesn’t learn to be humble soon, she may lose the chance to marry Prince Petros, whose dearest wish is to marry a kind-hearted lady. ---- This is the first book of the Magical Tales of True Loves series. This series of bedtime stories features old and beloved characters of Greek mythology together with new princes and princesses to spark your child’s imagination. From retellings with strange and wondrous twists to completely new legends and adventures, this collection will surely serve as great bedtime entertainment for parents and children alike. The stories may also serve as a reading and vocabulary enrichment exercise as they have been deliberately made to contain new words that parents may teach their children.
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Sarah

Sarah

W.E. Larson

Fantasy / Science Fiction / Children's

Set in the near future, police technician Ethan Pollard crosses paths with a beautiful Human Analog Bio-robotic. She’s on the run and has a head full of fragmented memories of a life she’s never lived. Only H.A.Bs don’t run away and they certainly don’t have some stranger’s memories.A Sci-Fi short story that presents an open-ended dilemma.Set in the near future, police technician Ethan Pollard crosses paths with a beautiful Human Analog Bio-robotic. She’s on the run and has a head full of fragmented memories of a life she’s never lived. Only H.A.Bs don’t run away and they certainly don’t have some stranger’s memories."Sarah" is about 7,300 words and is more about raising ethical questions than answering them. I’d call it PG-13.
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