Voices from the air, p.35

Voices from the Air, page 35

 

Voices from the Air
 



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retaking of 304, 306–10

  racism 9

  radio

  Australia, in 6, 13–14

  governments, and 14

  1920s 1

  1930s 1, 13

  1940s 13

  talkback 330

  Radio Newsreel 35, 63

  radio stations

  2GB 330, 333

  9PA 222

  radiotelephone 9, 20, 63, 206, 209, 329

  Ramu Valley 194, 203, 222

  Rangoon 283, 289–90

  Rasmussen, Brigadier JH 193, 200, 201–2, 267, 269, 271–2

  Rayer, Pendil 206

  RCA Communications (San Francisco) 261

  Reber, Grote 345

  recordings 20, 28, 30, 35, 44, 46, 65, 71, 81, 83, 87, 94, 109, 116, 121, 122, 185, 186, 188, 199, 210, 216, 219, 231, 237, 247, 276, 278–9, 301, 302, 303, 314, 315–16, 326, 337, 343, 345

  actuality 7, 22, 24, 26, 77, 107

  air raid sounds 78–81, 109, 114, 227, 274

  equipment 8, 9, 26, 36, 38–9, 50, 52, 55, 57, 64, 77–8, 80, 84, 107–8, 141, 142, 143, 160, 161, 168, 177, 210, 216, 227–9, 242–3, 272, 275, 277–80, 301, 315–16

  interviews 7–9, 24, 26, 62, 65, 68, 70, 83, 111, 119–21, 142, 159, 160, 162, 168, 170, 199, 225, 274, 275, 288, 289, 301, 315–17, 330, 342, 344, 346

  mobile 21–6, 34, 36, 85, 167, 227, 242–3, 313

  sounds of battle 9, 24–5, 77, 80–2, 114, 231, 274

  technical issues/problems 55, 57, 62–3, 64–5, 77, 80, 162, 210, 261, 341

  technicians see technicians

  Reichs-Rundfunk-Gesellschaft (RRG) 22

  Repatriation of Prisoners of War and Internees (RAPWI) 295

  Retreat from Kokoda 336–7

  Rippon Ridge 278

  Robertson, Jack 71

  Romulo, Carlos P 17, 90

  Roosevelt, Franklin 14

  Rose, Captain Bob 194

  Ross Creek 112

  Rowell, General 147, 148, 150

  Royal Air Force (RAF) 6, 42, 84

  carrying recordings 44, 46

  Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) 105, 106, 107, 112, 135, 228, 280 313, 329, 348

  Russo, Peter 16

  Sagarak 194

  Saidor 222, 242

  Saigon 339

  ‘St Percy’s School for Young Gentlemen’ 178

  Salamaua 173, 177–85, 190, 203

  Salankaua Plantation 196

  Salient (Tobruk) 75–7, 81

  Salonika 55, 96

  Samarinda 288

  Sanana Island 318

  Sanananda 140, 158, 159, 161, 169, 171, 205

  Sandakan death marches 344

  Santo Tomas 284

  Sarawak 109

  Sarawak River 302

  Sattelberg Mountain 195, 196, 202, 211, 212–15, 242, 277

  scabies 293

  Second World War

  correspondents see war correspondents

  start of 19

  Shaggy Ridge 219, 227

  Shanghai 16

  Shaw, George Bernard 14

  shortwave radio 9, 20, 53, 91, 96, 118, 198, 209, 237, 247, 256, 284, 285, 301, 328

  Sidi Barrani 34, 36

  Sidon 66–7

  Silem, Bert 284

  Silk, George 58, 171

  Simmonds, Florence see Duckmanton, Florence

  Simpson, Claire 240

  Simpson, Fred 7, 11, 201, 317, 329, 342–3

  background 210–11

  Balikpapan 286–8

  Borneo 286–8, 302–3

  character 240

  death 343

  death of Elliott 287

  illness 213, 222, 272

  Japanese surrender (Borneo) 302–3, 342

  Korean War 343

  military service 211

  New Guinea 209–17, 227, 240–3, 247, 272–5

  post-war 343

  Wewak, capturing 272–5

  Simpson, Thelma 210

  Singapore 17, 90, 103, 283, 328

  ABC bureau 322

  fall of 10, 60, 94–5, 97–102, 105, 109, 133, 295, 327–8

  liberation of 10, 289, 290–1, 339

  Sio 222, 242

  Slessor, Kenneth 58, 254, 337–8

  Smith, Bill 286–8

  Sollum 34, 37, 46, 65

  Solomon Islands 217, 237, 239, 264

  sources of information 9

  South East Asia 10, 289

  South East Asia Command (SEAC) 285, 289

  Sparrow Force 126, 127, 131

  Spender, Percy 38

  SS Vyner Brooke 295, 297–8

  Stalking the Jap 242

  Starlight and Serenades 348

  Stein, Guenther 17

  Stokes, Evie 328

  Stokes, Henry 7, 11, 60, 107, 327–8

  background 95–6

  death 328

  post-war 328

  Singapore, fall of 96–103, 327–8

  Stokes, Jonathan 328

  Stokes, Meredith 328

  The Struggle for Europe 324

  Sturdee, Lieutenant General 306

  Suez 30

  Suez Canal 30

  Sulawesi 320

  Sumatra 294, 295, 297

  Sunda Strait 89

  surgery, front line 191

  Surigao Strait 251

  Sydney 92

  Japanese submarines in 109, 233, 342

  Japanese surrender, news of 313–14

  Syria 65, 71, 77, 82

  Tacloban 250–1, 255

  Tambu Bay 182

  Tanah Merah Bay 230–2

  Tarakan 276–9, 282

  Taves, Brydon 206

  technical issues/problems 55, 57, 62–3, 64–5, 77, 80, 162, 210

  technicians 7, 8, 9, 12, 107, 115, 344

  technology 9–10, 13, 20, 344, 345

  mobile 21–6

  Tel Aviv 31

  telegrams 9, 237

  telegraph 13, 20, 212

  Templeton’s Crossing 153

  Ternate 316–17, 318

  Thai-Burma Railway 292–4

  Thermopylae 57, 58

  Thomas, Major 316

  Thompson, Jack 346

  Thompson, John 7, 12, 346–7

  background 305–6

  character 305–6

  death 347

  Indonesia 310, 339, 346, 347

  military service 305

  poetry 306, 346, 347

  post-war 346–7

  Rabaul 309–10

  Thompson, Patricia (nee Drakeford Cole) 305, 346

  Thompson, Peter 346

  Timor 11, 106, 109, 124, 125–32, 133, 312

  Timor Sea 105

  Tobruk 34, 41–4, 50, 65, 87, 141, 323, 341

  siege of 71–83, 84, 218

  Tokyo 16, 91, 226, 254, 329

  Japanese surrender 282, 300–2, 332

  Tol Plantation massacre 309

  Top End 118–24

  Torricelli Mountains 266

  Townsville 92, 110, 111, 112–15, 117, 139

  bombing 114–15

  Troops 306

  Turkey 71

  Turnbull, Norma see Hemery, Norma

  ulcers 293

  USS Missouri 300, 301

  Veria Pass 55

  Vichy French 66, 70

  Vietnam War 323

  “Voices from Overseas” 31, 63, 71, 77, 83

  Wadi Auda 73

  Wakde island group 231

  Walker, David 95

  War Correspondent 224

  war correspondents 1–2, 89, 168–9, 174, 246, 261–2, 299 see also by name

  ABC 2–3, 5, 7–8, 24, 26, 93, 136, 322

  American 262, 338–39

  BBC 24–5, 63, 75, 90–1, 185, 188, 289, 324

  censorship see censorship

  death in action 8, 206, 283, 284, 286–8, 337–8

  illness 8, 70, 131, 138–9, 151, 156, 163, 169–71, 177, 204, 213, 222, 226, 255, 268, 271, 272, 331, 333–4, 335, 338

  injury 8, 127, 131–2, 206–8, 236, 244, 249, 252, 338


  military aircraft, flying on 148, 160, 181, 186, 203, 206–8, 227–9, 252, 256, 280

  restrictions on movement 267, 269

  role of 7–9, 86–8, 121–2, 136, 200, 217, 322

  stories delayed 77, 148, 160, 177, 181, 182, 195–6, 199, 270, 278–9, 299

  weapons, carrying 182, 215, 220–1, 230, 242, 267

  war crimes trials

  German 324

  Japanese 12, 311–21, 347, 348

  Ward, Edward 53, 75

  Washington 91

  Wau 178

  Wavell, General 61

  Weekend Magazine 341

  Western Desert 34, 35, 36, 44, 47, 50, 64, 65, 142, 167, 220

  Wewak 173, 185, 228, 230, 241, 246, 263, 266, 272–5

  White, Osmar 143–4

  Why I sent Such Brilliant Recordings from Tarakan 279

  Williams, Gordon 118, 198, 255

  Wilmot, Chester 5, 6, 10, 61, 111, 116, 132, 193, 224, 289, 323–5, 336, 344

  army PR, and 51–2, 147–51, 201

  background 28–30

  Bardia 36–41

  Benghazi 48–50

  Blamey, conflict with 147–51, 323

  character 50, 63, 144, 324–5

  D-Day 324

  death 325

  Derna 45–8

  Europe 289, 323–5

  Greece, in 52–9, 61, 95

  HMAS Perth 63–5

  Middle East, in 30–50, 60, 62–86, 88, 96, 111, 135, 148, 326

  New Guinea 132, 140–53, 155

  Pacific war 89, 111–12, 114–15, 132, 140–53, 155

  post-war 324–5

  propaganda, on 51–2

  Tobruk 41–4, 71–5, 77, 78–83, 323

  Townsville 112–13, 114–15

  war correspondents, view of 86–8, 89

  wounded by shrapnel 84–5, 86

  Wilmot, Edith (nee Irwin) 29, 61, 69, 79, 80, 111, 325

  wire recorder 315–16

  Woodlark Island 175–6

  Woodward, David 324

  Woolley, Sergeant Donald 315

  Wootten, Major General 302

  Wyer Point 169

  Wykes, SA 17, 90, 94

  Yamamura, Major General 302–3

  Yodda Valley 156

  Yokohama 301

  Young, Barry 113, 180

  PHOTOS SECTION

  The ABC field unit – the utility truck and ‘Jumbo’ the three-ton mobile studio, before leaving for the Middle East. The utility travelled close to 20,000 kilometres across the battlefronts of North Africa, Greece and the Middle East. 1940. (ABC Archives)

  Interior of the ABC mobile studio used by Chester Wilmot, Lawrence Cecil and the technicians, Bill MacFarlane and Leo Gallwey. The Chevy van was fitted out with recording turntables using sapphire needle cutting heads to cut tracks into the discs. 1940. (ABC Archives)

  Telegram received at the ABC in Australia from Arthur Mason in the London office, 1 September 1939, carrying the text of Hitler’s radio address to the German people, signalling his intention to invade Poland. London was the first and most important source of independent news for the ABC. Urgent messages or news from the London office were sent by telegram; other communication was mostly by letter. (NAA)

  Chester Wilmot, photo taken in Tobruk, 1941. Wilmot was the first ABC war correspondent. (ABC Archives)

  Chester Wilmot writing at his table in the villa at Ikingi Maryut. The house was not far from Alexandria on the edge of the Western Desert and was the advance base for the field unit during their coverage of the Libyan campaign. (Photo courtesy of Wilmot family)

  Lawrence Cecil in the Middle East with ABC colleague and bandleader Jim Davidson, who was in charge of concert parties for the AIF. As a radio producer, Cecil was well known to many broadcasting figures serving overseas. May 1941. (NAA/ABC Archives)

  Chester Wilmot with his gear, and typewriter in hand, on the wharf at Piraeus. Believed to be upon his arrival with Lawrence Cecil and Bill MacFarlane to cover the Greek campaign with the AIF. After a brief stay in Athens they headed into the mountains where Australian troops were awaiting the expected German invasion. They were evacuated a few weeks later through the port of Piraeus with the retreating Allied forces. March 1941. (Photo courtesy of Wilmot family)

  The ABC field unit utility truck being landed safely at Alexandria after the evacuation from Greece. Very few vehicles were saved during the evacuation of 50,000 Allied troops. Lawrence Cecil and Bill MacFarlane sailed with the truck and the field unit recording equipment; their ship was attacked five times on the journey across the Mediterranean. April 1941. (NAA/ABC Archives)

  ‘In a moment or two we found ourselves joined by a party of Diggers who came bowling down the road on some very fractious mules.’ Queensland Diggers in Syria who fought in the battle for Merdjayoun, with Lawrence Cecil, listening to the BBC news on the field unit radio by the side of the road. June 1941. (NAA)

  Chester Wilmot recording one of his reports from Acre, Syria. Set up on the back of a truck, the microphone is protected against the wind by a white cloth. A ceasefire had come into effect in Syria and Lebanon the day before the photo was taken. Following the Syrian campaign, Wilmot headed to Tobruk to record the story of the long siege of the Allied garrison. 13 July 1941. Photograph by George Silk. (AWM/ABC Archives)

  By the harbour at Tobruk, Chester Wilmot scans the skies for enemy planes with microphone in hand. September 1941. (ABC Archives)

  Bill MacFarlane plays back a recording of Scottish gunners at Tobruk. September 1941. (NAA/ABC Archives)

  One of Wilmot’s original scripts from Tobruk, Front-line Post. The script shows Wilmot’s corrections and workings and the stamp of the military censor, passing the script for broadcast. Written in Tobruk by Chester Wilmot, 29 September 1941. (NAA)

  Henry Stokes, a former Reuters and newspaper correspondent, was one of the most experienced ABC war correspondents. He covered the Spanish Civil War and the Balkans during the Second World War before returning to Australia. He was the ABC and BBC correspondent in Singapore and escaped just before the British surrender. (Photo courtesy Meredith Stokes)

  The ABC truck bogged in the forward area in Papua. Believed to be the day before Bill MacFarlane drove Wilmot, Damien Parer and Osmar White to the foothills leading to the Kokoda Trail. It’s possible that Wilmot is one of those in the photo. 18 August 1942. (AWM)

  Peter Hemery (without shirt) recording in the Northern Territory. At one stage Hemery operated the recording equipment himself when the technician Ed Jinks fell ill. The car immediately behind him is probably the ‘old green grass-hopper’, the bullet-holed sedan commandeered by the field unit. 1943. (NAA/ABC Archives)

  Peter Hemery, ABC war correspondent 1942–1943 (Photo courtesy Peter Hemery)

  Peter Hemery talking to a Kittyhawk pilot about his tactics against Japanese fighters. Hemery stayed with Kittyhawk squadrons in the Northern Territory and recorded the daily activities of Australian and American flyers. 1943. (NAA/ABC Archives)

  Bill Marien, ABC war correspondent 1942–1944 (NAA/ABC Archives)

  Bill Marien writing a despatch while seated on a wrecked Japanese plane near Lae. Marien entered Lae immediately behind the troops of the Australian 7th Division who were the first into the town. ‘Smashed planes garlanded the runway and revetments like a bedraggled necklace of faded owers,’ wrote Marien. September 1943. (ABC Archives)

  Dudley Leggett (second from right) after a press conference in the model room at Headquarters, New Guinea Force in Port Moresby. Left to right are: Colonel JH Rasmussen, Acting Director General Public Relations; General Sir Thomas Blamey; Leggett; and Major D Dwyer, personal assistant to Blamey. 13 September 1943. (AWM)

  Dudley Leggett, ABC war correspondent 1942–1943 (ABC Archives)

  Telegram from Ray Paull, Aitape, New Guinea. Press telegram was one means of sending news copy from forward areas. Phrasing like ‘the fresh Australian campaign . . . will not be spectacular’ indicates the limitations on reporting that cont
ributed to the friction between correspondents and army PR. 9 January 1945. (NAA)

  Telegram from Fred Simpson, Wewak, New Guinea, advising the ABC that the recording gear had been damaged by Japanese shellfire. Simpson and Len Edwards scrambled to safety but their tent was destroyed. Simpson covered the final stages of the campaign that began with Ray Paull at Aitape. 25 May 1945. (NAA)

  Ray Paull recording a report on board a USAF B-24 Liberator bomber. Together with the technician Len Edwards, Paull recorded a report of a raid by Australian bomber air crew on a Japanese base at Kairiru Island, off the New Guinea north coast. March 1944. (AWM)

  Ray Paull and other war correspondents fording a river at Aitape, New Guinea. Paull and the other correspondents were restricted in some of their reporting of the Aitape campaign, leading to clashes with army PR. Left to right: Ray Paull, Gordon Holland (Argus), Kim Keane (Melbourne Herald), Jim Fitzpatrick (photographer), Don Angel (Department of Information). 16 March 1945. (AWM)

  Ray Paull, ABC war correspondent 1944–1945 (Photo courtesy of Vivienne Benton)

  Len Edwards with recording equipment in the fuselage of a B-24 Liberator bomber. Edwards is using a lightweight portable recorder that he made himself to handle the cramped space and vibration aboard the bomber. The recording was made with war correspondent Ray Paull during a raid against the Japanese on Kairiru Island, New Guinea. March 1944. (AWM)

  Len Edwards, ABC war correspondent (radio technician) 1942–1945 (Courtesy Chris Edwards)

  Len Edwards’ war correspondent identity card. (Courtesy Chris Edwards)

  Haydon Lennard, ABC war correspondent, 1942–1945 (ABC Archives)

  Telegram despatch from Haydon Lennard in Singapore, reporting the landing of Allied troops following the Japanese surrender. 5 September 1945. (NAA)

  Fred Simpson, ABC war correspondent 1943–1945 (ABC Archives)

  Fred Simpson recording a report in kunai grass, New Guinea. Bill MacFarlane is operating the recorder and a young local, Marea, is assisting Fred with the microphone. The photo was taken very soon after Fred arrived in Port Moresby. December 1943. (AWM)

 

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