The Rose of Old St. Louis

The Rose of Old St. Louis

Mary Dillon

Classics / Fiction

"A thoroughly joyous romance....A vivid story whose combination of truth and charm will win for it great popularity." -Montgomery Advertiser "It is a genuine love story....Full of incident....The author has done her work in a delightful fashion, blending the historical and the romantic so deftly that each helps the other to the working out of a complete and satisfying impression." -The Examiner "A love story, strong, thrilling, and fine; and the dainty Pelagie, with the hero whose name she whispers, will be found sufficient to the interest of any reader with a heart for wooings and winnings." -New York World "Centers about a young gentleman of Philadelphia and a French maiden of surpassing loveliness. Many historical personalities appear, and the details are given with accuracy....The love story goes on amid the intricacies of French and Indian intrigue, and concludes in a glow of happiness for all." -The Christian Advocate "In the novel \'The Rose of Old St. Louis,\' frequent mention is made of the hospitality that prevailed in these homes. Feasts and dances are described, and from these the rude pioneer inhabitant was rigidly excluded. Men and women, attired in Parisian style, participated. Many of the guests were military officers. The only living thing now extant connecting the present era and the past, of the chivalrous times, are the lilies on the Sweet Springs grounds." -Centennial History of Missouri "The characters are people who were famous at the time of the Louisiana purchase." -Cambridge Public Library Bulletin "Mary Dillon\'s book is a romance of the time of the Louisiana Purchase, that event in the history of our country the importance of which we are just beginning to appreciate. A young American soldier and a daughter of the old French family are the hero and heroine of the love story, and this is made to exhibit incidentally made interesting characters - Thomas Jefferson, Meriwether Lewis, Black Hawk and the heads of those families whose names are still preserved in the streets of St. Louis, and at the other side of the water Napoleon, Talleyrand, Marbois and Le Moyne. There could be no better piece of history for the purpose of such a story, and Mrs. Dillon has proved her skill equal to her materials." -The Literary News "With sufficient knowledge and access to trustworthy authorities the author has woven into the story veritable history. The reader of this book will...easily and with pleasure absorb the history of the great event which doubled the territory of the United States and changed the whole course of its progress....From beginning to end the story is fresh and clean as a May morning, and may be safely put in the hands of the young with the double purpose of furnishing them with amusement and instruction." -The Unitarian Register
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