History of Orrin Pierce

History of Orrin Pierce

George Bird Grinnell

History / Short Stories / Nonfiction

Unlike some other reproductions of classic texts (1) We have not used OCR(Optical Character Recognition), as this leads to bad quality books with introduced typos. (2) In books where there are images such as portraits, maps, sketches etc We have endeavoured to keep the quality of these images, so they represent accurately the original artefact. Although occasionally there may be certain imperfections with these old texts, we feel they deserve to be made available for future generations to enjoy.
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Jack the Young Cowboy: An Eastern Boys Experiance on a Western Round-up

Jack the Young Cowboy: An Eastern Boy's Experiance on a Western Round-up

George Bird Grinnell

History / Short Stories / Nonfiction

Jack\'s cowboy life began just as a great change was sweeping over the cattle range. Cattle had first been brought into the country only a few years before—old-fashioned long-horns driven up over the trail from Texas.In those days the people in the West were not many. Towns were small, farms almost unknown, wagon roads few. Except about the pastures of the larger ranches, there were no fences. Over most of the land the cowboy roamed alone.His seemed a life of romance. Free as the birds, he wandered over the wide range, going when and where he pleased. But this romance was only apparent. No man worked harder than he, or for less reward. His toilful days and short broken nights; his small pay and his poor food were recorded in the songs that he sang as he rode about the cattle. This was in the early days of the cattle industry.A little later, on the plains came a change from pioneer conditions to those approaching luxury.The earlier cattlemen in the North—those who ranged their stock on the Platte and the various forks of the Loup River—made great profits. Yet as time went on they saw competition constantly growing sharper and ranges being overstocked. As the news of their profits drifted eastward many young men, allured by the romance of the cowboy\'s life, and ignorant of its actual conditions, came into the cattle country. These believed that success with cattle was to be attained by riding about and watching the cattle increase and grow, and shipping them to market when they had grown. They were glad to be interested in a business at once so agreeable and so profitable; and many a one exchanged his money for a herd, a brand and some log buildings, and rode over the range awaiting the advent of his riches. Many of the early cattlemen sold their herds to the newcomers, who, somewhat later, discovered that with the cattle they had bought also much experience.These changes were in operation when Jack entered on his cowboy life.
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Monicas Choice

Monica's Choice

George Bird Grinnell

History / Short Stories / Nonfiction

The door closed silently after the retreating maid, and Mrs. Beauchamp sighed wearily. How often, lately, she had been obliged to send some such message to her wilful young granddaughter, and, how many more times would she have the same thing to do? Her aristocratic features wore a perturbed expression, as her slender fingers toyed mechanically with the many rings on her left hand; so great a responsibility was her only grandchild. "I am sure I wish Conrad had never left her with me," she mused; "and yet there seemed no other solution of the difficulty when the regiment was ordered out to Simla. It was impossible, of course, to take her with him, and poor Helen was so opposed to boarding-schools. But it has certainly been a mistake having her here. Such an unruly, passionate nature as Monica\'s needs very careful handling, and not one of these governesses has had the tact to manage her. I\'m sure I don\'t know what to do about her." Mrs. Beauchamp\'s ruminations were cut short by the abrupt entrance of a girl of fifteen, tall, and with a haughty mien, but possessing a face which denoted much character, albeit it wore an unpleasant scowl at the present moment. Pushing the door to behind her with no gentle hand, so that it slammed violently, causing a jingling among the pretty knick-knacks with which the handsome drawing-room was lavishly ornamented, Monica Beauchamp stood before her grandmother, like a young lioness at bay.
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With the Swamp Fox: A Story of General Marions Young Spies

With the Swamp Fox: A Story of General Marion's Young Spies

George Bird Grinnell

History / Short Stories / Nonfiction

MY UNCLE, THE MAJOR.He who sets himself down to write of his own deeds in order that future generations may know exactly what part he bore in freeing the colonies from the burdens put upon them by a wicked king, must have some other excuse, or reason, than that of self-glorification.Some such idea as set down above has been in my mind from the moment Percy Sumter—meaning my brother—urged that I make a record of what we did while serving under General Francis Marion, that ardent patriot and true soldier, who was willing to make of himself a cripple rather than indulge in strong drink.I question if there be in the Carolinas any one who does not know full well the story of that night in Charleston, when, the door being locked upon him in order that he might be forced to drink, General Marion—then only a colonel—leaped from the window, thereby dislocating his ankle, rather than indulge in a carousal which to him was unseemly and ungentlemanly.This is but a lame beginning to what it is intended I shall tell regarding those days when we two lads, Percy and myself, did, as it has pleased many to say, the work of men in the struggle against foreign rule; yet however crude it may appear to those better versed in the use of the pen, it is the best I can do. My brother and myself went into General Marion\'s camp before our fourteenth birthday, and since that time have studied the art of warfare instead of letters, which fact is due to the troublous times rather than our own inclination, for my desire ever was to improve my mind until I should be at least on equal terms with those lads who were more favored as to country.First let me set down that of which we two—meaning Percy and myself—can honestly claim without fear of being called boastful.Our mother was sister to those noble gentlemen, John, William, Gavin, James and Robert James, who one and all devoted their fortunes and their lives to the cause of the independence of the Carolinas. She married a Sumter, who died while yet we twins were in the cradle, and, therefore, we were come to look upon ourselves as true members of the James family, rather than Sumters, priding ourselves upon that which every true Carolinian is ready to declare, that "he who rightfully bears the name of James is always ready for the foe, the first in attack and the last in retreat."CONTENTSMy Uncle the MajorGeneral MarionThe Tory CampSamuel LeeThe AmbushThe PrisonersThe RetreatBlack Mingo SwampThe BattleGeorgetownGabrielILLUSTRATIONS.I Clasped the Old Man\'s Hand, Understanding for the First Time What a Friend He WasAs the Tory Spoke, Percy Leaped Upon HimThen Suddenly a Red-coated Tory Rushed Toward Me with Upraised SaberAs Gavin Gathered Up the Weapons, Percy and I Called Upon the Sleepers to SurrenderIn the Darkness We Four Comrades Were Sent Forward to ReconnoitreGavin Seized My Arm, Shouting in My Ear: "Surrender, Lad, Surrender!"
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Mary of Plymouth: A Story of the Pilgrim Settlement

Mary of Plymouth: A Story of the Pilgrim Settlement

George Bird Grinnell

History / Short Stories / Nonfiction

The purpose of this series of stories is to show the children, and even those who have already taken up the study of history, the home life of the colonists with whom they meet in their books. To this end every effort has been made to avoid anything savoring of romance, and to deal only with facts, so far as that is possible, while describing the daily life of those people who conquered the wilderness whether for conscience sake or for gain. That the stories may appeal more directly to the children, they are told from the viewpoint of a child, and purport to have been related by a child. Should any criticism be made regarding the seeming neglect to mention important historical facts, the answer would be that these books are not sent out as histories, although it is believed that they will awaken a desire to learn more of the building of the nation,- and only such incidents as would be particularly noted by a child are used.(Typographical errors above are due to OCR software and don\'t occur in the book.)About the Publisher Forgotten Books is a publisher of historical writings, such as: Philosophy, Classics, Science, Religion, History, Folklore and Mythology.Forgotten Books\' Classic Reprint Series utilizes the latest technology to regenerate facsimiles of historically important writings. Careful attention has been made to accurately preserve the original format of each page whilst digitally enhancing the aged text. Read books online for free at www.forgottenbooks.org
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The Seashore Book: Bob and Bettys Summer with Captain Hawes

The Seashore Book: Bob and Betty's Summer with Captain Hawes

George Bird Grinnell

History / Short Stories / Nonfiction

Leopold Classic Library is delighted to publish this classic book as part of our extensive collection. As part of our on-going commitment to delivering value to the reader, we have also provided you with a link to a website, where you may download a digital version of this work for free. Many of the books in our collection have been out of print for decades, and therefore have not been accessible to the general public. Whilst the books in this collection have not been hand curated, an aim of our publishing program is to facilitate rapid access to this vast reservoir of literature. As a result of this book being first published many decades ago, it may have occasional imperfections. These imperfections may include poor picture quality, blurred or missing text. While some of these imperfections may have appeared in the original work, others may have resulted from the scanning process that has been applied. However, our view is that this is a significant literary work, which deserves to be brought back into print after many decades. While some publishers have applied optical character recognition (OCR), this approach has its own drawbacks, which include formatting errors, misspelt words, or the presence of inappropriate characters. Our philosophy has been guided by a desire to provide the reader with an experience that is as close as possible to ownership of the original work. We hope that you will enjoy this wonderful classic book, and that the occasional imperfection that it might contain will not detract from the experience.
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Light for Little Ones

Light for Little Ones

George Bird Grinnell

History / Short Stories / Nonfiction

This is a pre-1923 historical reproduction that was curated for quality. Quality assurance was conducted on each of these books in an attempt to remove books with imperfections introduced by the digitization process. Though we have made best efforts - the books may have occasional errors that do not impede the reading experience. We believe this work is culturally important and have elected to bring the book back into print as part of our continuing commitment to the preservation of printed works worldwide. This text refers to the Bibliobazaar edition.
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Martha of California: A Story of the California Trail

Martha of California: A Story of the California Trail

George Bird Grinnell

History / Short Stories / Nonfiction

FOREWORDThe author of this series of stories for children has endeavored simply to show why and how the descendants of the early colonists fought their way through the wilderness in search of new homes. The several narratives deal with the struggles of those adventurous people who forced their way westward, ever westward, whether in hope of gain or in answer to "the call of the wild," and who, in so doing, wrote their names with their blood across this country of ours from the Ohio to the Columbia.To excite in the hearts of the young people of this land a desire to know more regarding the building up of this great nation, and at the same time to entertain in such a manner as may stimulate to noble deeds, is the real aim of these stories. In them there is nothing of romance, but only a careful, truthful record of the part played by children in the great battles with those forces, human as well as natural, which, for so long a time, held a vast portion of this broad land against the advance of home seekers.With the knowledge of what has been done by our own people in our own land, surely there is no reason why one should resort to fiction in order to depict scenes of heroism, daring, and sublime disregard of suffering in nearly every form.A CHANGE OF HOMESIn case one should ask in the years to come how it happened that I, Martha Early, who was born in Ashley, Pike County, in the state of Missouri, and lived there until I was twelve years old, journeyed across the prairies and deserts to California, the question can be answered if I write down what I saw when so many people from our county went to make new homes in that state where gold had been found in such abundance.For my part, I used to wonder why people should be willing to leave Missouri, enduring the many hardships they knew awaited them on the journey of two thousand miles, in order to buy land in a country where nearly all the inhabitants were Spaniards and Mexicans.I suppose the stories told about the wonderful quantity of gold which had suddenly been found in California caused our people to think particularly of that far-off land. When the excitement of getting rich by digging in the earth a few weeks or a few months had in a measure died away,CONTENTSA Change of HomesJoe BowersThe Reasons for MovingMother\'s AnxietyHow We Were to TravelOur Movable HomeLeaving AshleyEben JordanOn the RoadEben\'s PredictionsWhat We Heard about CaliforniaThe First EncampmentNight in CampThe Town of IndependenceKansas IndiansLooking into the Future for TroubleA Stormy DayA Lack of FuelMaking Camp in a StormA ThunderstormAnother Company of PikersThe Stock Stray AwayAn Indian VillageI Weary with so much TravelingEben\'s BoastsSuffering with ThirstIn Search of WaterQuenching our ThirstMaking ButterA Kansas FerryThe Surprise at Soldier CreekBread MakingPrairie PeasEben as a HunterA Herd of BuffaloesExcitement in the CampA Feast of Buffalo MeatCuring the MeatA Wash DayUncomfortable TravelingEllen\'s Advice regarding the StoryIndians and MosquitoesPrairie DogsColonel Russell\'s MishapChimney RockAt Fort LaramieCooking in Front of a FireplaceTrappers, Hunters, and IndiansOn the Trail Once MoreIndependence RockArrival at Fort BridgerWith our Faces toward CaliforniaAt Bear RiverThe Coming of WinterUtah IndiansA Dangerous TrailSunflower Seeds and Antelope StewA Forest FireThe Great Salt LakeEben as a FishermanGrasshopper JamA Deserted VillageThe Great Salt DesertPreparing for a Dangerous JourneyBread and Coffee MakingBreaking Camp at MidnightThe Approach to the Salt DesertA Plain of SaltLike a Sea of Frozen MilkSalt DustA Bitter DisappointmentCoffee instead of WaterA Spring of Sweet WaterThe OasisSearching for WaterThe Beautiful ValleySnake IndiansA Scarcity of FoodSprings of Hot WaterIn the Land of PlentyThe Truckee RiverA
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