Princess Belle-Etoile

      Frank Gee Patchin

Princess Belle-Etoile

The Classic European Children’s Tales series is a collection of timeless stories from Europe translated into modern English. These classic tales are a great way to expose children to the literature of different cultures and to introduce children to basic words in foreign languages. In this French series, each story includes original illustrations and provides English to French translations and pronunciation assistance for selected words. ‘Prince and Princess Stories from France’ includes the following classic children’s tales:1.Princess Grace and Prince PercinetThe beautiful Princess Grace finds herself at the mercy of a cruel step-mother who despises the Princess for her grace and beauty. Separated from her father, the princess gets help from a mysterious character in order to find happiness again.2.The Story of Princess BlondineIn a far away kingdom Princess Blondine goes on a wild adventure after becoming lost in a magic forest. Princess Blondine meets the most curious of creatures and learns a few important lessons on her journey.3.Prince Narcissus and the Princess PotentillaThe poor Princess Potentilla is imprisoned in a secure house away from the world. When Prince Narcissus uses magic to catch a glimpse of the princess they fall in love with the help of a friendly fairy. However the cunning and evil Enchanter has other ideas and tries to steal the Princess away.4.The Princess MayblossomLocked in a tower to protect her from the evil fairy Carabosse, Princess Mayblossom finally escapes with an unlikely rescuer. However the Princess learns that people sometimes aren’t as they seem.
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    The Pony Rider Boys in Texas; Or, The Veiled Riddle of the Plains

      Frank Gee Patchin

The Pony Rider Boys in Texas; Or, The Veiled Riddle of the Plains

"What's that?" "Guns, I reckon." "Sounds to me as if the town were being attacked. Just like war time, isn't it?" "Never having been to war, I can't say. But it's a noise all right." The freckle-faced boy, sitting on his pony with easy confidence, answered his companion's questions absently. After a careless glance up the street, he turned to resume his study of the noisy crowds that were surging back and forth along the main street of San Diego, Texas.
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    The Lost Army

      Frank Gee Patchin

The Lost Army

|Let’s go and enlist!”“Perhaps they won’t take us,” was the reply.“Well, there ‘s nothing like trying,” responded the first speaker.“Nothing ventured, nothing gained.”“That’s so,” said the other. “And if we can’t go for soldiers, perhapsthey ‘ll find us useful about the camp for something else.”This conversation took place between two boys of Dubuque, Iowa, onepleasant morning early in the year 1861. They were Jack Wilson andHarry Fulton, neither of whom had yet seen his sixteenth birthday. Theywere the sons of industrious and respectable parents, whose houses stoodnot far apart on one of the humbler streets of that ambitious city; theyhad known each other for ten years or more, had gone to school together,played together, and at the time of which we are writing they wereworking side by side in the same shop.The war for the destruction of the Union on the one hand and itspreservation on the other had just begun. The election of AbrahamLincoln....
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    Boris the Bear-Hunter

      Frank Gee Patchin

Boris the Bear-Hunter

Boris the Bear-Hunter by Frederick WhishawThe moment at which I propose to introduce my readers to Boris the Bear-Hunter came very near, as it happened, to being the last which my hero was destined to spend upon this earth. Great hunter as Boris was, there is no doubt about it that on this particular occasion he met his match, and came within measurable distance of defeat at the hands—or rather paws—of one of the very creatures whose overthrow was at once his profession and his glory.It happened many a year ago—about two hundred, in fact; and the scene of Boris's adventure was an exceedingly remote one, far away in the north of Europe, close to Archangel.Boris Ivanitch was a peasant whose home was an outlying village near the large town just mentioned. He was a serf, of course, as were all his fellows at that time; but in consequence of his wonderful strength and courage, and of his aptitude for pursuing and killing every kind of wild beast and game, he was exempt, by favour of his lord, both from taxation and from the manual labour which the owner of the soil could have exacted from him. In a word, Boris was employed to keep the country clear, or as clear as possible, of bears and wolves, which, when left to themselves, were at that time the cause of much danger and loss to the inhabitants of that portion of the Russian empire.Boris performed his duties well. There was no man, young or old, for hundreds of miles around who could compare with this young giant in any of those sports or competitions in which the palm went to the strongest. Tall and muscular beyond his years—for he was but nineteen at this time—lithe as a willow, straight as a poplar, Boris excelled in anything which called into play the qualities of activity and strength. Had he lived in our day and attended an English public school, he would undoubtedly have come to the front, whether on the cricket or the football field, on the running path or on the river. But being debarred from the privileges of English schoolboys, Boris was obliged to expend his energies in those exercises which were open to him, and which alone were familiar to the people of his country—snow-shoeing, hunting, swimming, and similar sports natural to the livers of a wild, outdoor life in a scarcely civilized land.
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