Codename Prague

Codename Prague

D. Harlan Wilson

D. Harlan Wilson

ReviewIn this second installment of his scikungfi trilogy (after "Dr. Identity"), Wilson ups his creative ante with new bursts of stream of cyber consciousness prose to rival Gilbert Sorrentino ("Mulligan Stew") and William Burroughs ("Naked Lunch"). With the cinematic feel of "Pulp Fiction" and a sound slap at modern culture, this should attract a select audience that appreciates metafiction and pulp action. --Library Journal, January 11, 2011 Product DescriptionSince he assassinated the Nowhere Man, Vincent Prague hasn't been the same, haunted by the ontological impossibility of the kill. His celebrity status has skyrocketed, however, and everybody wants a piece of him. The MAP (Ministry of Applied Pressure) promotes him to Anvil-in-Chief, the catbird's seat of special agents. Under the so-stupid-it's-genius alias of "Vincent Codename Prague," he works a case that leads him to the Former Czech Republik's Prague, a dark cirque du city where androids run wild, femme fatales chronically manhandle him, and a mad chef named Doktor Teufelsdröckh has created a Hitler/Keats/Daikaiju hybrid that would make Frankenstein's monster sing like a Von Trapp ... In an overtechnologized world of constant reckoning, all Vincent has are his wits, his weapons, and a briefcase full of replaceable extremities to crack a mysterious code that, he soon discovers, resides within himself. "This novel is from the wild edge of science fiction, in the tradition of Philip K. Dick's Three Stigmata of Palmer Eldritch--fast, smart, funny, and full of a scarily plausible vision of just how weird things could get if we take our biological fate into our own hands."--Kim Stanley Robinson, Nebula, Hugo, Locus, BSFA and John W. Campbell Award-winning author "This intense mixture of giddy activity, cyberpunk essences, avant fusion and social satire may make your head spin at an accelerated rate. Actual brain damage is unlikely, in most cases."--John Shirley, Bram Stoker Award-winning author "_Codename Prague_ is a thrill-a-minute combination of James Bond, Robert Ludlum, and cyberpunk, set in a dangerous, erotic, and not-as-distant-as-you'd-wish future."--Mike Resnick, Nebula and Hugo Award-winning author of 100+ novels, collections, anothologies and nonfiction books "Who IS this guy?"--Pat Cadigan, Arthur C. Clarke Award-winning author
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Dr. Identity

Dr. Identity

D. Harlan Wilson

D. Harlan Wilson

From WikipediaDr. Identity (2007) is the fourth book and first novel by American author D. Harlan Wilson. Set in a dystopian, mediatized future where people surrogate themselves with android lookalikes, the novel focuses on the foils of an English professor (Dr. 'Blah), his psychotic android (Dr. Identity), and their flight from the agents of the Law, especially the "Papanazi." Like much of Wilson's work, Dr. Identity is distinguished by its ultraviolence, metanarration, and critique of media technology. It is the first novel in the Scikungfi Trilogy along with the forthcoming Codename Prague (2009) and The Kyoto Man (2010). Read more - Shopping-Enabled Wikipedia on Amazon In the article: Cover Description | Table of ContentsFrom BooklistTwo hundred years in the future, academia is infested with loafing professors who routinely send their android doubles--or "'gangers"--in to teach their classes, and bored "student-things" keep awake only by ingesting ephedrine-laced doughnut holes. At Bliptown's Corndog University, the practice of android substitution leads to mayhem when Dr. Identity, the 'ganger for English professor Blah, accidentally murders a prominent student-thing. To cover his tracks, Dr. Identity methodically slaughters the entire English department and flees with the stunned Professor Blah on a jetpack over Bliptown's sprawling cityscape. How the ever-resourceful Dr. Identity and his hapless charge navigate the surreal and bewildering technological landscape of Bliptown while evading the ubiquitous "papanazi" militia fills out the plot of Wilson's madcap, macabre black comedy. Along the way, readers meet rudely intrusive newsmen, mechanical bug-eyed monsters, and an aspiring papanazi known only as Achtung 66.799. Wilson's sardonic, riotously imaginative vision of the future holds a mirror up to our own increasingly chaotic society and makes provocative entertainment. Carl HaysCopyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved
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